Author: The Editors

Entertainment, Politics, and Power: Georgia’s Creative Industries in Light of the New Voting Law

By Aylin Güngör In March 2021, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp signed Senate Bill (SB) 202 that reformed the state’s voting laws. Put forward by Republican senators in the aftermath of Georgia’s Democratic swing and former president Trump’s allegations of voter fraud in 2020, the bill was born with the stated…

Memory-based urban planning: a case for memory culture in German military conversion

by Julian Kramer A city itself doesn’t remember its inhabitants, buildings, or events that have taken place in it. The physical entity of infrastructure and buildings can’t actively have memory. It needs its inhabitants to do the active work of remembering. At the same time, it is the material surroundings…

Twilight Zone, Paranoia, and Conformity in 1950s America

by Max Schiersner Caodaglio “There is a fifth dimension beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of man’s…

Working on the History of the January 6th Capitol Attack

by Lauren Rever In a Congressional hearing on May 12, 2021, Republican Representative Andrew Clyde (Georgia) said about the Capitol insurrection: “You know, if you didn’t know the TV footage was a video from January the 6th, you would actually think it was a normal tourist visit” (Itkowitz 2021). Representative…

From the Chicago 8 to the Camden 28: Some History of the Great “Political Trials” of the Long 1960s

By Michelle Nickerson,  Loyola University Chicago and Heidelberg Center for American Studies In October 2020, the streaming service Netflix started making a feature film adaptation of the historic 1969 trial of new left radicals known as the “Chicago 7” available to viewers. In this dramatic production by the celebrated American…

When TikTok Meets the Catch-All Concept of National Security

by Shasha Lin TikTok, a video-sharing app launched in the fall of 2017, is the first Chinese social media platform to achieve major success in the U.S., especially among teens and members of ‘Gen Z’1 (Collier 2020). By June 2020, a few months after stay-at-home orders were implemented across the…

Civil Conversations About Faith: A Sociolinguist’s View

By Dr. Linda Sauer Bredvik To paraphrase Nietzsche—is religion dead, and have we killed it? Contrary to predictions by sociologists and political scientists in the mid 1900s, “postmodernity has not led to the end of religion; rather, the globalizing world has provided new ways of doing religion and being religious”…

Civil Conversations About Faith: A Sociolinguist’s View

By Dr. Linda Sauer Bredvik To paraphrase Nietzsche—is religion dead, and have we killed it? Contrary to predictions by sociologists and political scientists in the mid 1900s, “postmodernity has not led to the end of religion; rather, the globalizing world has provided new ways of doing religion and being religious”…

Falling into the Crevice – Covid-19 Pandemic Puts Spotlight on Housing Disparities in the U.S. Capital

by Judith Keller and Lauren Rever “The crisis isn’t just that we need rent cancelled. Just like before the crisis unhoused people and people paying these exorbitant rents and mortgages won’t be able to pay. (…) If you use a visual of a crevice, people are just falling into the…

Who’s Playing the Blame Game? – An Analysis of Media Framing of China and COVID-19 in The New York Times

By Shasha Lin and Hien Le Pham On January 6, 2020, The New York Times (hereafter “NYT”) published its first report on COVID-19 with the headline “China Grapples with Mystery Pneumonia-Like Illness.” This mysterious virus was later described by its reporter Denise Grady as “a deadly Chinese coronavirus” on January…

Five Years after Ferguson, a Glimpse into Police Work with Body-Worn Cameras

by Louis Butcher This past summer marked the five-year anniversary of Michael Brown’s killing by police in Ferguson, Missouri. The St. Louis Police Officers’ Association head, Jeff Roorda, acknowledged the occasion by uploading a Facebook post featuring a photo of Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, Brown’s shooter, and a caption…

Rising Levels of Skepticism

Organized Climate Change Skepticism in the U.S. By Hanna Thiele Unfortunately, Climate Science has become Political Science. It is tragic that some perhaps well-meaning but politically motivated scientists who should know better have whipped up a global frenzy about a phenomena which is statistically questionable at best. Robert H. Austin,…

Little Rock, Big Impact: Centering Small Cities in U.S. Urban History

by Monica N. Campbell Check out the guest post by Monica N. Campbell who participated in this year’s Spring Academy at the Heidelberg Center for American Studies: View of the Arkansas River and downtown Little Rock looking west from the Clinton Presidential Library, 2018, credit: Monica N. Campbell Between 1950…

What graduates can learn from reading Michelle Obama’s ‘Becoming’

By Kristin Berberich When I was given the former First Lady’s much-hyped memoir for Christmas by my supervisor, I was beyond excited. Given the current media landscape, the response to Michelle Obama’s Becoming was as ecstatic as it was critical. Fox News’ Laura Ingraham (2018) accused her of “cashing in…

Is Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Really a “Perfect Foil for the Pro-Trump Media”? – A Word on the American Media Landscape

by Aleksandra Polińska The latest midterm elections in the United States have brought many changes to the country’s political landscape. Concentrated on the side of Democrats, the 2018 congressional and gubernatorial victories included the first Native American and the first Muslim congresswomen, the first female senators from Tennessee and Arizona,…
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search