Author: The Editors

The Confinement of Outer Space

By Annika Elstermann To begin, let us look towards the stars. Culturally, the firmament has always held a fascination for writers and audiences, not just in a mystical sense, but also as a place which exists and which might be reached, traversed, visited, explored, but which is as yet uncharted.…

The Confinement of Outer Space

By Annika Elstermann To begin, let us look towards the stars. Culturally, the firmament has always held a fascination for writers and audiences, not just in a mystical sense, but also as a place which exists and which might be reached, traversed, visited, explored, but which is as yet uncharted.…

“What a nun is supposed to be”: Black Power and the National Black Sisters’ Conference

by Venus Bender In his 1971 speech “On the Relevance of the Church” at the Theological Union in Berkeley, California, the Black Power activist Huey P. Newton referred to the church as an essential institution for building a Black community after both the church and the Black Panther Party had…

Crime, Class, and the City: Colson Whitehead’s Harlem Shuffle (2021)

by Valentina Lopez Liendo Where do you go as a writer after being awarded back-to-back Pulitzer Prizes? Somewhere where you “get to be funny again,” as Colson Whitehead states (Feldman 2021). In his last two novels, Whitehead explored the horrors of slavery in Underground Railroad and the traumatic violence of…

Crime, Class, and the City: Colson Whitehead’s Harlem Shuffle (2021)

by Valentina Lopez Liendo Where do you go as a writer after being awarded back-to-back Pulitzer Prizes? Somewhere where you “get to be funny again,” as Colson Whitehead states (Feldman 2021). In his last two novels, Whitehead explored the horrors of slavery in Underground Railroad and the traumatic violence of…

Collision Course: Don’t Look Up and the Politicization of Science in America

By David F. Eisler On last Christmas Eve, Netflix released the star-studded satirical disaster movie Don’t Look Up about two American astrophysicists named Dr. Randall Mindy and Kate Dibiasky (played by Leonardo DiCaprio and Jennifer Lawrence) who face ignorance, apathy, and political hostility as they attempt to persuade the government…

Civil Rights & Civil Wrongs

How the Right Responded and Responds to Demands by Civil Rights Activists[i] By Georg Wolff In an academia where fetishized innovation breeds sensationalist mediocrity, where ‘new’ and ‘good’ are used interchangeably, it is a rare occurrence that a historiographic work achieves the appropriate half-life to be considered a true classic.…

Breaking the Silence – #MeToo and the Reclaiming of the Feminist Framing of Sexual Harassment

By Nicole Colaianni In December 2017, Time magazine named “The Silence Breakers” as Person of the Year. It was the first time the magazine honored a group instead of just one person with the title. The magazine’s intention was to both celebrate these women (and some men) as individuals as…

Writing the modern mother: The complex struggles of motherhood in Brit Bennett’s The Mothers (2016)

By Johanna Decker Mothers have served as some of the most beloved heroines, but also as some of the most hated villainesses in film and literature. There is the loving, caring ‘angelic’ mother, who will sacrifice herself in a heartbeat for her cherished child – The Scarlet Letter’s Hester Prynne,…

Entertainment, Politics, and Power: Georgia’s Creative Industries in Light of the New Voting Law

By Aylin Güngör In March 2021, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp signed Senate Bill (SB) 202 that reformed the state’s voting laws. Put forward by Republican senators in the aftermath of Georgia’s Democratic swing and former president Trump’s allegations of voter fraud in 2020, the bill was born with the stated…

Memory-based urban planning: a case for memory culture in German military conversion

by Julian Kramer A city itself doesn’t remember its inhabitants, buildings, or events that have taken place in it. The physical entity of infrastructure and buildings can’t actively have memory. It needs its inhabitants to do the active work of remembering. At the same time, it is the material surroundings…

Memory-based urban planning: a case for memory culture in German military conversion

by Julian Kramer A city itself doesn’t remember its inhabitants, buildings, or events that have taken place in it. The physical entity of infrastructure and buildings can’t actively have memory. It needs its inhabitants to do the active work of remembering. At the same time, it is the material surroundings…

Twilight Zone, Paranoia, and Conformity in 1950s America

by Max Schiersner Caodaglio “There is a fifth dimension beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of man’s…

Working on the History of the January 6th Capitol Attack

by Lauren Rever In a Congressional hearing on May 12, 2021, Republican Representative Andrew Clyde (Georgia) said about the Capitol insurrection: “You know, if you didn’t know the TV footage was a video from January the 6th, you would actually think it was a normal tourist visit” (Itkowitz 2021). Representative…

From the Chicago 8 to the Camden 28: Some History of the Great “Political Trials” of the Long 1960s

By Michelle Nickerson,  Loyola University Chicago and Heidelberg Center for American Studies In October 2020, the streaming service Netflix started making a feature film adaptation of the historic 1969 trial of new left radicals known as the “Chicago 7” available to viewers. In this dramatic production by the celebrated American…
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search