Featured posts

Recreating Ancient Beauty

By Eboni John, published as part of the Undergraduate Series The society of ancient Rome was just as obsessed with cosmetics and beauty as we are today. Indulging in the use of items such as white lead foundation, ash-based eye-shadow and poppy petalled blush, it is clear that the Romans’…

Semantic promiscuity as a factor of productivity in word formation

The blog post introduces ideas discussed in our project about taking a closer look at word formation from a semantic (or semasiological) point of view. Since this so far underinvestigated approach to word formation processes lacks proper terminology, a new term to denote the central research question of concept-based type-frequency…

What to do with a heap of old manuscripts?

From the letter of the conservatory of the Bibliothèque nationale to the minister of the interior, May 18th, 1798 Friday No. 7, November 16th, 2018 Close your eyes, and imagine that among your worldly possessions there is a heap of old manuscripts inherited from your maternal great-uncle who died almost…

A historian’s view of NER (named entity recognition)

Following up on Pierre’s inspiring post, I wish to start a dialogue between historians and computing specialists around the tools we share in the ERC project. This series of methodological posts also answers our common concern with keeping track of the research process, making transparent every decisions we make and the…

Nodes, edges and diagrams. A report on work in progress from the “networks” working group

Von Rodney Ast, Clementina Caputo, Jana Pacyna und Michael R. Ott I. Introduction About three years ago the CRC’s working group 7 started to analyze one of the most formative metaphors of the early 21st century: networks. First, we concentrated at a more theoretical level on “Actor-Network-Theory” (ANT), most often associated…

Unity of science: Why linguistics faces bigger challenges than the replication crisis

Over the last few years, psychologists and scientists in some other field have been talking (and worrying) a lot about problems of replicability and reproducibility. In psychology, people even talk about a “replication crisis”, and linguists have been thinking about replicability (e.g. of cross-linguistic generalizations, Plank (ed.) 2006) and reproducibility…

In Search of Efen

By  Allison Shichen Du, published as part of the Undergraduate Series This summer, I started a journey to explore Manchu (Manzu) food both in books and in real life. After reviewing A Comprehensive Manchu-English Dictionary written by Jerry Normanin May, I thought that flour-made foods are very important in the…

Prospero over the ocean #1

The challenges of a semantic and argumentative approach of corpus in the era of “big data” Francis Chateauraynaud and Josquin Debaz (GSPR – EHESS, Paris) Social science methodologies face continuous challenges emerging from the evolutions of the digital worlds. Promises and prophecies connected with the rise of big data are…

From Fieldwork to Trees 1: Data preparation

A colleague of mine has recently returned from his fieldwork, where he collected data on on the dialectal variation of the Alorese language of Alor and Pantar in the East Nusa Tenggara province of Indonesia. He collected data on 13 Alorese varieties, including word list data. One obvious step for comparing the…

The monstrance, the thief and the Dominican nuns of Brussels

  Stories from the archives of the English convents in exile The English Dominican nuns of the second Order were founded by Cardinal Philip Howard at Vilvorde (near Brussel) in 1661; in 1669, they settled in what was to be their long-term house, locally known as the Spellikens, in Brussels.…

Hwang Hee-Young, « Sharing Korea’s Economic Development Experience and Seeking New Future-Oriented Relationships: Korean Studies in West Africa, the Case of the Ivory Coast »

Located in West Africa, the Ivory Coast became a colony of France in 1893 and gained its independence in the 1960s, establishing diplomatic relations with South Korea in 1961. Two years before independence in 1958 in the then-capital of Abidjan, the Abidjan Center for Higher Education was founded with the…

ICES 20, Mekelle University

COMPTE-RENDU DE COLLOQUE / CONFERENCE REPORT 20th International Conference of Ethiopian Studies – Mekelle University, October 1-5, 2018 « Regional and Global Ethiopia – Interconnections ad Identities » The Cfee was a partner of the 20th International Conference of Ethiopian Studies hosted by Mekelle University, Octobrer 1-5, 2018. The program and book…

Reforming Failed Infrastructure, Struggling for the State: Lessons from Lebanon

Watch the full video of the Centre for Policy Research-CSH (Centre de Sciences Humaines) workshop, featuring Eric Verdeil on ‘Reforming Failed Infrastructure, Struggling for the State: Lessons from Lebanon’ on the 30th of october 2018. The talk considers infrastructure as a site for the examination of urban governance in Lebanon,…

Illustrating weaknesses in technology : the drone case

The development of drones in the military has often led to the feeling that a Terminator like future was coming on fast. The subject is huge, but if we focus solely on drones (and not robots…), it is really interesting to see that the imaginaries offer a variety of responses…

The All-Volunteer Force and Contemporary American War Fiction

by David Eisler When the United States abolished the draft in the final stages of the Vietnam War, the effects went beyond simple changes in military personnel policy; they also rippled into the field of cultural production. What can we learn about this process by comparing the fictional responses to…

An introduction to Ted Nasmith’s illustrated Silmarillion

The end of October was devoted to a close reading of the Silmarillion illustrated by Ted Nasmith. I only had a dim memory of the book, having read it years ago in its French translation, in a couple of days, absorbing every new name as quickly as I forgot them.…