Featured posts

What does Public History have to do with a monument’s fate?

Author: Lucas Avelar is a Master’s student and Graduate Teaching Assistant at Colorado State University, and is part of the Heritage and Teaching of History research team at the Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO). 6 June 2020, Londonhttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Black_Lives_Matter_-_49977691057.jpg The ongoing battle of memories and narratives about…

Rewriting Histories of Care in the Times of Corona

By Eliska Bujokova The term ‘research impact’ has become a buzzword in funding applications across academia, but as the current crisis has shown, its use often seems rather hollow. Doing historical research during the pandemic has become difficult as a result of practical constraints, but mostly due to my own…

On vagueness and uncertainty in historical data

Historians face a specific challenge: they need to derive conclusions from evidence which is always incomplete, contradictory and anything but precise. Historical information systems and software systems used for their implementation must therefore be based upon a model of information which reflects these properties of the available sources. To clarify:…

Meta-constructing social theory

Certain hypotheses are constantly tested in social science. The impact of income inequality on health, racial bias on police brutality and public opinion on elections, just to name a few. At some point more tests of the same hypothesis stop contributing to scientific knowledge, and may even harm it by…

Unlearning Border Fixity — Towards a relational pedagogy after the nationalist crisis

von Die Redaktion · Veröffentlicht 8. Juli 2020 · Aktualisiert 1. Juli 2020 by Adrian Schlegel The year 2020 might fill our descendants’ history books with the rampant phenomena that emerged around the COVID-19 pandemic. The global health crisis, aggravating social inequalities, political authoritarianism, gender-based discrimination and economic fragility might…

Tell me what metaphors you use and I will tell you… #ReframeCovid metaphors

By Aleksandra Salamurović Photo by Dominik Reallife on Unsplash „China and the rest of the world are sailing in the same river, which is churned up by storms and waves, and we hope that more people will swing the oar together to steer the ship through the dangerous water, instead…

THE KEY TO BALANCE

INTRODUCTIONHave you ever thought why the Tower of Pisa doesn’t fall? Despite being crooked, the tower does not fall, since the vertical of its centre of gravity (vertical line drawn from the centre of gravity) is inside the base. But do you know what the center of gravity of a…

“How Does Healing Sound” – to the Sound Projects of Yoko K. Sen

Screenshot from the video “Hospital of the Future” Comment on the Article “Wie klingt Heilung” (How Does Healing Sound) (1) by Jean Odermatt. Yoko K. Sen is a sound artist and founder of Sen Sound with the vision to change the sound environment in hospitals. In 2014, she was hospitalized due to health complications. There she was deeply disturbed by…

VEGETABLE PAINTERS

INTRODUCTIONIn this challenge we talk about the colors that we can see in nature, the biological pigments. Biological pigments are substances produced by colored organisms. The reason these molecules have colors is the result of different chemical processes. But do you know about biological pigments? The color of an animal’s…

Small-scale agriculture in crisis due to the Coronavirus pandemic

While most people in the Netherlands feel relieved because the measures against the pandemic are gently being relaxed and they can enjoy drinking beer together again, the majority of the world’s population faces a very different reality. Covid19 has made global inequality even more visible than before. In Europe and…

Francis Mosley and The Silmarillion – a talk in video

As I wrote about here, my paper was selected for the Tolkien Society Seminar 2020. The overall theme of the event was “Adapting Tolkien”, which could hardly be more fitting for my research. I took this opportunity to focus on a lesser-known illustrated book in my PhD corpus: The Silmarillion…

Ugandan fathers in the lockdown

There is a saying in Uganda: “omwana omubi, avumaganyisa nyina”, “an undisciplined child is a disgrace to the mother”. A friend from Kampala brought it to my attention, ironically observing that, according to another saying, “a good child is the father’s pride”. These adages hint to unequal recognition in the...

Musical Workers’ Precarity Uncovered and the Revival of Mutual Aid in Chile

Eileen Karmy and Estefanía Urqueta Independent Researchers   The protests that began in Chile in October 2019 revealed the crisis of a process of democratisation with pending matters. The protests were mostly directed against the legacy of the Pinochet dictatorship, which for thirty years has been run by successive elected…

Home is not what you think

by Eva Illouz, Sociology, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris The Corona pandemics is more easily classified as a natural disaster than a man-made evil (although this is easily questionable given that it is the result of man-made zoonotic spillovers and given that China’s totalitarian…

Into Ibn Ṭūlūn’s Endowed Library (Part 2)

One earlier post has outlined several obstacles in assessing Ibn Ṭūlūn’s book collection in contrast to the books he himself authored. Together with Merlis Emre, a master student of Konrad Hirschler, I revisit this question here, complicating the differentiation between books Ibn Ṭūlūn owned and arguably read, and those he…