Featured posts

Illustrated Recipes in Crophill’s Cookery

By Sarah Peters Kernan While I was researching medieval and early modern cookeries for my dissertation, I came across several manuscripts that were notable in one regard or another but they did not make it into my final document. In the hope of inspiring further research, I am focusing on…

How much can recipes tell us about a family?

By Faye Glover Before The Digital Recipe Books Project I had always considered a recipe as just a set of instructions to make a food dish or a medical prescription. How naïve! I have now realised how recipes are invaluable primary sources to studying the domestic sphere in the early modern…

Consumerism, Waste, and Re-Use in Twentieth-Century Fiction Legacies of the Avant-Garde

This book examines manufactured waste and remaindered humans in literary critiques of capitalism by twentieth-century writers associated with the historical avant-garde and their descendants. Building on recent work in new materialism and waste studies, Rachele Dini reads waste as a process or phase amenable to interruption. From...

How to cure a ‘headache’ in a Mesopotamian way?

Strahil V. Panayotov (The BabMed, ERC-Project, Free University of Berlin) In 7th century BC Nineveh, in an area located within today’s much-troubled Iraqi city of Mosul, an astonishing episode of human history occurred. Thousands of texts from all corners of the Assyrian empire were brought into the royal capital of…

“L” IS FOR LYON. THE MARKETING AMBITIONS OF EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY FRENCH MERCHANT MANUFACTURERS, OR WHERE DID ALL THE LYONNAIS SILKS GO? LESLEY MILLER, SENIOR CURATOR OF TEXTILES, VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM, LONDON/PROFESSOR OF DRESS AND TEXTILE HISTORY, UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW

Lyon in the south-east of France was by the late 17th century the silk-weaving capital of Europe, its products ranging from simple, lightweight plain silks to elaborate brocaded silks woven with silver and gold. It was to these patterned silks that the city owed its reputation, as designers created new…

Tales from the Archives: English Gingerbread Old and New

In September, The Recipes Project celebrated its fourth birthday. We now have over 470 posts in our archives and over 117 pages for readers to sift through. That’s a lot of material! (And thank you so much to our contributors for sharing such a wealth of knowledge on recipes.) But…

A “travel blog” of the fourth century AD. The journey of Theophanes through Egypt and Syria.

Cristina Corsi (Università degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio meridionale) The sands of Egypt have preserved an astonishing quantity of private documents that represent for us an irreplaceable occasion to peep into the life of people with different social and cultural origins, engaged in daily routine as well as…

Notes from a Newly Discovered English Recipe Book

By Francesca Vanke Sir Robert Paston (1631-1683) of Oxnead Hall in Norfolk was known in his own time for his loyal support of Charles II, his magnificent house and kunstkammer collection, his political activities, and for his chymical and alchemical pursuits. His family died out in the early eighteenth century…

How to motivate incarcerated youth? Issues of an early-career researcher

This month’s contribution comes from Aniek van Herwaarden, who is a graduate student at Utrecht University, The Netherlands. She is involved in research projects which address behavioral problems in youth with mild intellectual disabilities. In this blog post, she evaluates … Continue reading →

Play on ontologies – Beetle contests in Thailand

Beetle Market. (Photo: Stéphane Rennesson)  Anthropology has been recently shaken by a so-called “ontological turn” that amends the central idea of sociocultural perspective of “one world, many worldviews” to invest the networking and the articulation of multiple worlds!  Drawing on my ethnography of uncanny games in which animals are the…

Four Seasons in Shakespeare’s World…

By the Shakespeare’s World team Cross-posted on https://blog.shakespearesworld.org with some slight differences. One year ago the Early Modern Manuscripts Online project at the Folger Shakespeare Library partnered with Zooniverse to officially launch Shakespeare’s World, in association with the Oxford English Dictionary. What better way to commemorate the 400th anniversary of…

Children’s disrupted wartime lives – recovered in the archives

By Lindsey Dodd During October and November 2016 I travelled around France, collecting historical source material about children’s lives in France during the Second World War. The source material is quite unusual: I have been seeking out and listening to filmed and audio oral history-type interviews with older French people…

An aesthetics of change.

The aesthetics of change: on the relative durations of the impermanent and critical thinking in conservation¹. by Hanna Hölling (courtesy of). ABSTRACT Can we conceive of artworks in terms of their temporal duration  –  as events, performances and processes ? Can artworks, including the recent portion of artistic production as…

Ancientbiotics: Medieval Medicines for Modern Infections

By Erin Connelly In 2015, Youyou Tu jointly won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the development of a new therapy (Artemisinin) to treat Malaria, a disease which has been on the rise since the 1960s. Significantly, the antimalarial component was successfully extracted from the plant Artemisia annua…

Looking for the American Revolution on TV

(This note contains significant spoilers on The West Wing, United States of Tara, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and 30 Rock.) Today, I’ld like to continue my series on Gouverner l’Amérique (Governing America), the book I’m writing on US televised political fiction for Vendémiaire, at the invitation of Ioanis Deroide. In…