Featured posts

Placing Ibn Tulun: Evidence from the Majallat al-Majmaʿ al-ʿilmi al-ʿarabi

As I have indicated before, the age when Ibn Tulun was most widely read might well have been the early 20th century. Ahmad Taymur had copies and photographic reproductions made of several of his works, and historians like ʿIsa Iskandar al-Maʿluf and Salah al-Din al-Munajjid also collected his works. Al-Munajjid…

Chomsky now rejects universal grammar (and comments on alien languages)

That our colleague Noam A. Chomsky no longer argues for a rich innate universal grammar (UG), containing many dozens (or even hundreds) of substantive features or categories, is old news. In Hauser, Fitch & Chomsky (2002), the authors say that the domain-specific faculty of language (=FLN) comprises only the property…

The Art of Preserving Eighteenth-Century Cookery Through Interpretation

Tiffany A. Fisk Every day my colleagues and I are asked by visitors to Colonial Williamsburg the following: “You aren’t REALLY cooking, are you?” The purpose of Historic Foodways is to do the work of eighteenth-century cooks by using and understanding the techniques, equipment, and recipes from the period. We…

A failed precedent? Attempts at international justice in the wake of the first World War and their legacy

On 22 August 2018, Pieter Lagrou gave a keynote lecture at the Conference To End All Wars, in Ypres, Belgium. The Gendarmerie in Grammont. Between October and November 1917, the Geheime Feldpolizei arrested children in Grammont for alleged sabotage of the railways in September-October 1917. The trial of Max Ramdohr was…

Tales from the Archives: Pen, Ink, and Pedagogy

This month, This Recipes Project is six years old. This September also marks our fourth Teaching Series, first launched by co-editor Amanda Herbert in 2014. This post comes from that first series, as Amanda provides some fantastic advice for bringing recipes–and more specifically ink–into the classroom. By Amanda E. Herbert I teach an undergraduate…

Music, hegemony and revolutionary violence

In a recent article published in Music & Politics, I examined the relationship between music, hegemony and violence in the political thought of the Italian composer Luigi Nono (1924-1990).1 I analysed in particular his interpretation of Antonio Gramsci’s ideas and how he addressed his political and ethical commitment in Für…

Do Objects Lie? Teaching About Food, Material Culture, and Evidence

Carla Cevasco During my most recent move, I observed (while sweating, and swearing, and trying to keep the packing tape from sticking to itself again) that kitchen items occupied more boxes than any other category of my possessions. Not even books could compete with the weight and bulk of my…

Computer Assisted Textual Markup and Analysis (CATMA) – An undogmatic approach to corpus analysis and Germany’s literary super heroes

Do you know CATMA? Not yet? Then read the following blog. Do you think you know CATMA? It’s still a good idea to read the following blog… CATMA is a web-application for text markup and analysis. Its central function is annotating, analyzing and visualizing one or multiple texts. CATMA has…

Water supply for the urban poor: bringing the utility into the discussion

As the Sustainable Development Goals call for universal access to drinking water, Akosua Boakye points at how water utilities in the cities of the Global South are caught in between the neo-liberal principles of economic efficiency and the equity imperative of providing services to the poorest. Nyalenda, Kisumu (Credits Akosua…

The Whitney Plantation Museum: An overview from curator Dr. Ibrahima Seck

The Whitney Plantation Museum is exclusively dedicated to the understanding of the facts of slavery. It is located in St. John the Baptist Parish, less than an hour west of New Orleans, Louisiana. Ambroise Heidel (1702-1770), the founder of the plantation, emigrated from Germany to Louisiana in 1721. He was…

Summarizing Andreas Reckwitz’s ‘Toward a theory of social practice (2002)’ with tables

Last June, while working on a paper with Stefan Wahlen, I finally read one of the most cited references when it comes to the theories of practice: Andreas Reckwitz « Toward a Theory of Social Practices: a Development in Culturalist Theorizing », European Journal of Social Theory, 2002, vol. 5, no 2,…

Love as a Practice

Pleasure and worry—that well summarizes the ambivalent feelings that take hold of a person trying to choose an essay on love, among the rows of a bookshop. He knows, within his heart of hearts, that such a book is likely to (re)arouse desire, excitement, the whole procession of feelings involved…

First Monday Library Chat: The David Walker Lupton African American Cookbook Collection

Welcome to the September 2018 edition of the First Monday Library Chat. This month we travel to Tuscaloosa and speak with Kate Matheny, Reference Services & Outreach Coordinator for Special Collections at University of Alabama Libraries.   The Lupton Collection is a key holding at the University of Alabama Libraries.…

Visualizing Education and Knowledge Organization with Palladio 2

To be frank, there was something wrong with the visualizations in the last post, and I did not feel like letting that stand. Thus, here I address some of those issues. Network discipline to person, main cluster [disciplines in light, people in dark]This is how the network should look or,…

How Best to Treat the Heat in 1793 Beijing

By Marta Hanson Translating traditional Chinese medical terms into modern English forces one to consider dramatic changes in medicine over the past two centuries. Take, for example, the modern Chinese phrase fa re for “fever,” which literally means “to produce (fa) heat (re).” Although today it refers to elevated body…