Featured posts

Researching Fictional Entanglements of Religion and a Dystopian Urban Imagination

— Daria Pezzoli-Olgiati A press photograph portrays a woman wearing an old-fashioned white bonnet and a red mantle, her mouth covered by a cloth of the same colour. Her clothing is a reference to the popular dystopian narrative by Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale (1985) that has become a global…

“In God’s name I enter”

Amelia Hutchinson (University of Cambridge) on Managing the Body and the Environment in Early Modern Mining

Towards Stronger Education for Democracy in Finnish and German Teacher Education

By Matti Rautiainen (University of Jyväskylä, Finland) and Daniel Vetter (Heidelberg School of Education) It’s true that democracy is a good idea. But that means nothing as long as the idea of democracy is not also learnt and put into practice. Education plays a central role when developing and maintaining…

Digital is good, but analog is better: On the trail of the Viennese Gumpenhuber chronicles

With the rapid advancement of digitization, it is now easier than ever to access information from all over the world at the click of a button. On her first visit to the Music Collection of the ÖNB (Österreichische Nationalbibliothek) in Vienna, our project employee Véronique was initially greeted by a…

Britain’s View of the German Cult of the Dead: A Media History Perspective

German Historical Institute London Blog In September 1943, at a time when the Second World War was turning into a military debacle for the German Wehrmacht, the Leicester Evening Mail published an article entitled ‘The New German Valhalla: Nazis’ Pagan Cult of Death’. In it, the author analysed the current…

Colourful Spots in Small Books

Complex procedures, countless trial and error attempts, characterised the production and use of colours in earlier eras. Existing knowledge was passed on primarily orally, but also in writing, and was used again and again in different ways. The basic colour materials were constantly upgraded and sensitively adapted to changing needs…

Hysteria: Unveiling Tunisian Women’s Journey in Writing Chick-Lit

By Cyrine Kortas Have you ever heard about a woman who would tell you that she made love because she wanted it? […] Almost half of Tunisian women were brought up in a complete denial of their bodies (Hysteria, p.122-123) Through these rhetorical questions posed by her fictional character Nadia,…

Pasta, Pasta, or Maccheroni? Obstacles in the Digital Culinary History Environment (Part 1 – Culinary Bibliographic Metadata)

By James Edward Malin and Gary Thompson This two-part post elaborates on three problems inhibiting the building and connecting of culinary research databases: obstacles to combining historical mediums, differences in data entry structures, and challenges of historical culinary ontologies. It could be said that culinary history’s multidisciplinarity nature makes it…

Can we diversify extremal events?

This post was originaly written in French and translated below. In a financial context, diversifying risks means investing in a variety of assets, sectors, or geographic regions to avoid having the poor performance of a single investment significantly affect the overall portfolio. Diversification allows for risk reduction, or, in its…

On (Dis)Agreeing Well in Mythbusting

The line between myth and fact can often be challenging to discern. This ambiguity regularly fuels heated discussion in educational and popular discourses about concepts like direct instruction, power-posing, and emotional intelligence (Siegel, 2024b)....

Large-Scale Research with Historical Newspapers: A Turning Point through Generative AI

by Sarah Oberbichler Digitized historical newspapers have been a crucial source for my research over the past decade. Exactly ten years ago, in 2014, I began my research journey with historical newspapers at the University of Innsbruck in Austria. Using a semi-automated multilingual approach to analyze a corpus of over…

The Ladies Association of Philadelphia: Political Consciousness and Political Leadership of Elite Women in the American Revolution

By Annabelle Hennemann The American Revolution is regarded as one of the most critical events in the history of the United States, culturally and politically (Greene 2000: 92-93). Until today, books, movies, and in the recent decade even Broadway, have portrayed the historical event as the ultimate fight for personal…

Separating the chronicles using Python

Before we enter the world of digital handwriting analysis in the next few blog posts, here is a brief insight into the pre-processing of the data. As mentioned in the last blog post, there are four volumes of Philipp Gumpenhuber’s chronicles in the Theatre Collection of the Houghton Library at…

An Extended Concept List of Vietnamese

As part of our ongoing endeavour to expand the possible mappings in Concepticon, I introduce an extended concept list of Vietnamese based on the Intercontinental Dictionary Series (IDS). The list includes elicitation glosses for 1,310 concepts that can be used as a reference to add more data or for comparative…

The Politics of Knowledge Production in Migration Studies

Over the last 30 years, Migration Studies has become increasingly institutionalized in Europe, with the number of migration-related chairs, degree programs, institutes, networks, and journals growing steadily. In the course of the 2015 crisis of the European border regime, political institutions significantly increased their demand for knowledge on migration. This…

ai and the Middle East, The Algorithmic Ghosts of Empires Past

When we talk about artificial intelligence in the Middle East, we cannot untangle it from the region’s long and tumultuous history with power – the lingering spectres of colonialism, the brutalities of military occupation, the revolving hierarchies of ethnic and sectarian oppression. AI does not exist in a vacuum, but…
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search