Featured posts

Three Generations of Book Sales

Snippet from the auction catalogue of Henrik Albert Schultens (1794)Friday n° 31, May 16th, 2019 In last week’s post I addressed the inaugural lectures delivered by three generations of the Schultens family, Albert Schultens (1686-1750), Jan Jacob Schultens (1716-1778), and Henrik Schultens Albert (1749-1793). As interesting as their family practices…

The Claudian Harbour (Tiber delta): a « Fluvial Pompeii »

This blog post ties into the exhibition “Claudius: An emperor with an extraordinary fate” that has toured around France and Italy. This exhibit featues the life and achievements of the Roman Emperor, Claudius, who was born...

Bound forms and welded forms: Two basic concepts of general grammar

Linguists often try to characterize affixes in terms of a notion of “boundness“, as in this passage of the Wikipedia article “affix“: “Lexical affixes are bound elements that appear as affixes, but function as incorporated nouns within verbs” But what exactly is meant by “bound”? Is it just a synonym…

Connections between N’ko and Ajami

Robust traditions of Ajami exist and have been relatively well documented and studied for major West African languages such as Wolof, Hausa, and Fulani. It surprising then that thus far there have been few Ajami texts found for major Manding varieties such as Bamanan, Maninka and Jula [1]. Today, in…

Smelling of Roses in Ancient Rome

By Laurence Totelin as part of the perfume series The painter Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912) had a knack for depicting the — sometimes imaginary — luxurious excesses of the Romans. In The Roses of Heliogabalus, he depicted a banquet hosted by the emperor Elagabalus (218-222 CE). Vast amounts of delicate rose…

All Good Things Must Come to an End – Concluding Blog Post

Over the course of this project, my colleagues and I have used George III’s menus as a lens to assess various aspects of the royal court and life in the late eighteenth century. Our work stemmed from transcribing these menus, and as such has allowed us to shed light on…

Slavery’s Past and Present: Challenges to Academic Research and Museum Work in Germany and Britain

By Dana Hollmann The association of Great Britain with the transatlantic slave trade and the enslavement of people of African descent is a common one. However, this is very different in the case of the Holy Roman Empire (HRE). Despite existing research in this field, there are still voices from…

Gentrification and Erasure: LGBTQ History in a Southern Suburb

Author: David S. Rotenstein, public historian and folklorist based in Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaHistory is one of the earliest and in some ways most invisible victims in gentrifying neighborhoods. Gentrification frequently is cyclical: each successive wave of new, wealthier people moving into a space erases the bodies, material culture, and histories of…

Migration as a Social Movement

Article de blog du 09 mai 2019 de L.C. Jones et N.A. Wonders, consultable sur le site https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/centre-criminology/centreborder-criminologies/blog/2019/05/migration-social  » Guest post by Lynn C. Jones and Nancy A. Wonders, Professors in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northern Arizona University. Dr. Jones’ research and publications focus on gender,…

Fanny Burney: The Keeper of the Robes

Frances “Fanny” Burney, circa 1785 Fanny Burney, who is best known as the author of novels Evelina and Cecilia, held the position of ‘Keeper of the Robes’ in the court of King George III and Queen Charlotte between 1786 and 1790. As Keeper of the Robes, Burney aided in dressing…

The civet trade in eighteenth-century London

By Kirsten James as part of the perfume series Civet was an indispensable ingredient for early modern perfumery. This yellow, musky-smelling liquid from the perineal glands of carnivorous civet animals (Viverra civetta) was used in a bewildering range of recipes. Given its perceived potency, it was almost always diluted with…

Dr Willis: The Cure to the King’s Madness or his Personal Torturer?

Earlier in the year, I transcribed a number of King George III’s menus from February 1789. In each instance, the title of ‘Dr Willis’s servant’ appeared, prompting me to investigate who this Dr Willis was. With this motivation too, I decided to explore Willis’s life and the treatment he conducted…

Is Gephi a Black Box?

This text was inspired by Emilija Jokubauskaite’s master’s thesis at DMI under Bernhard Rieder’s supervision. She studied Gephi and its epistemic culture, conducting a series of interviews (including mine) and reflecting on the relations between the tool and its users, mostly in the social sciences. Gephi and Its Context: Three…

INDIEN 1 BnF

The source of all the pictures of INDIEN 1 is BnF BnF INDIEN 1 (ex- Tamoul 1) from the BnF is a bundle of 22 palm-leaf folios (250 x 40 mm) (Figs. 1‒2). The manuscript is from the Ariel collection and cannot thus be later than 1855, when Ariel’s manuscripts…

Behind the Sino-Tibetan Database of Lexical Cognates: Introductory remarks

One of the major efforts behind our recently published paper on the origin and spread of the Sino-Tibetan languages (Sagart et al. 2019) was the creation of a database of lexical cognates which was used to run the phylogenetic analyses. The creation of this database started about four years ago,…

DeGraff on equality, universal grammar, and creolization

Michel DeGraff is a prominent creolist and advocate of Haitian Creole, who works as a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has a recent short piece on human equality and UG (universal grammar), published on the occasion of Noam A. Chomsky’s 90th birthday. DeGraff’s central point is that…