Featured posts

To dine at Kew: The meals of George III and his household

By Rachel Rich Lately I’ve been thinking about whether the kitchen at Kew, c. 1789, should be considered as a domestic space or a public one. The reason this has been on my mind is because I’ve been working with Lisa Smith and Adam Crymble on a project we’ve provisionally…

A Tale of Two Omelettes, Part 2

By Amy Vidor and Caroline Barta A good French omelette is a smooth, gently swelling, golden oval that is tender and creamy inside. And as it takes less than half a minute to make, it is ideal for a quick meal. There is a trick to omelettes, and certainly the…

Can Religions and Sciences Dialogue?

How can we explain the strong resurgence, starting in the 1980s and 90s, of interest in the relationship between religion and science and the appeals to “dialogue” between them, even though they are so far apart in their objectives and methods? As Brother Marie-Victorin, the famous scientist from Quebec, said…

Natalie Klein-Kelly, DOT TO DOT: Exploring humanitarian activities in the early Nineteenth Century

Natalie Klein-Kelly, Fellow of the GHRA 2017 DOT TO DOT: Exploring humanitarian activities in the early Nineteenth Century through tracing prehistories of the Red Cross Movement in Geneva Histories of humanitarianism often cite two specific examples of nineteenth century humanitarianism: the latter parts of slave abolition movements and the founding…

A Tale of Two Omelettes, Part 1

By Amy Vidor and Caroline Barta La Varenne’s Ham Omelette (Recipe #76) Simply take a dozen eggs, and break them, saving only half the egg whites. Beat them together. Take your ham, and prepare as necessary (chop / dice / etc). Mix it with your eggs. Then, take some lard,…

Thinking Language and Translation with Henri Meschonnic (respondant commentary)

(Participation au colloque « Thinking Language with Henri Meschonnic » à l’Université Queen Mary University à Londres, le 22 septembre 2017, comme modérateur lors de la table ronde sur Meschonnic et la traduction. Participants : Professeur John E. Joseph de l’Université d’Edimbourg (communication : « Language-Body Continuity in the Linguistics-Semiology-Poetics-Traductology of Henri Meschonnic »),…

The Virtual Genealogical Archive: making available on-line the parish and civil registers from Bucharest and Brașov county archives (Romania)

by Rafael Dorian Chelaru, Faculty of Archival Sciences,” Al. I. Cuza” Academy, Bucharest (RO) Digitization work on the Bucharest © Collection Laurentiu DolognaAcknowledgments. The results of the current research have been made possible through the project „The Virtual Genealogical Archive – a pilot project destined to the National Archives of Romania and…

Antiquity and cinema : 1. Egypt

Cinema has soon dealt with historical events, and yet to retrive distant times is not so easy. During the shooting of Land of the pharaohs, Howard Hawks bitterly complained not to know how a pharaoh used to speak and think. Staging the past cannot avoid to face present matters, such…

Feeding Under Fire: Medicinal Food

By Simon Walker When I first began Feeding Under Fire, I was excited for the episode on medicinal food because it offered the chance to combine my public engagement platform and my PhD research into the improvement of soldiers’ bodies in the First World War. Now that the video is…

Narratives and arguments at Leicester IPA conference

Tomáš Dvořák & Simon Smith Institute of Sociological Studies, Charles University in Prague On July 7th 2017 a panel “Narrativizing institutional crises” took place at the Interpretive Policy Analysis (IPA) conference in Leicester, UK. The panel was organized with a specific goal. It was to focus on narratives of crisis,…

The Recipe as Feminist Text: A Reflection on the Writing of Preserving on Paper

By Kristine Kowalchuk In writing Preserving on Paper: Seventeenth-Century Englishwomen’s Receipt Books, (University of Toronto Press, 2017) I found the opening sentence from L.P. Hartley’s The Go-Between often came to mind: “The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.” I have long been interested in food and…

ER1 – Reminiscing on a Year of DiXiT

So apparently it’s October 2017 already. DiXiT has officially ended a month ago, and it’s been six since the end of my fellowship. How did this happen? Is DiXiT really over? Thankfully, re-reading my co-fellows’ final DiXiT blogposts (by Tuomo, Frederike, Misha, Roman, Elena, Linda, and Merisa) seems to suggest that it isn’t…

A recipe for a community — 5 Years On

By Marieke Hendriksen  My first contribution to The Recipes Project appeared in June 2013: a post on mercurial drugs, the topic of my then postdoctoral project at Groningen University. Elaine Leong had read my own research blog, The Medicine Chest, and invited me to contribute. Seventeen posts and over four…

The end

DiXiT is dead. Long live DiXiT. I won’t lie. I have avoided writing this for a long time because I simply didn’t want to admit that DiXit had come to an end. But now, it’s 7:30 pm on a Saturday night, I’ve got a dram of whisky, and I think…

Scholarly editing around Europe

Farewell from DiXiT by ESR 6 As the DiXiT period comes to an end … it is not easy, but at least pleasant because of the good memories, to sum it up. DiXiT started for me in April 2014 when I left the École des Chartes in Paris and arrived…

The Technological Society by Jacques Ellul

A Book Review by Adam Zmarzlinski   To read Jacques Ellul’s The Technological Society is to begin a self-reflective journey through one’s own day-to-day interactions with technology. Part-history and part-political sociology, the text is a detailed analysis of everyday activities—both individual and societal such as cleaning or economies—and their historical…