Featured posts

Simple XSLT experiment: building up a concordance dictionary from a corpus

  During the lexical master class in Berlin, we worked together with Simonetta Battista and Ellert Johannsson on the Dictionary of Old Norse Prose. One of the little exercises we have done was to use XSLT in order to generate lexical entries automatically from an existing annotated textual corpus of…

The myth of interpretability of econometric models

There are important discussions nowadays about data modeling, to choose between the “two cultures” (as mentioned in Breiman (2001)), i.e. either econometrics models or machine/statistical learning models. We did discuss this issue recently in Econométrie et Machine Learning (so far only in French) with Emmanuel Flachaire and Antoine Ly. One…

Could there be a sort of IPA for morphosyntactic concepts?

The IPA is so immensely useful for linguistics that nobody questions its use, even though it sometimes creates misunderstandings (e.g. the misconception that the characters defined in the IPA represent the set of possible sounds in the world’s languages). But so far, nobody has suggested that there could be something…

“Once in a life-time”. A documentary on living with water

Since I arrived to the Netherlands, I wondered if Dutch people are afraid of living with water. That idea gave me the opportunity to do research about the effects of the high water and evacuation of 1995 in the lives of the residents, as part of the Hydro Social Deltas…

GROBID Dictionaries: Experiments with the General Basque Dictionary (OEH) PDF

GROBID Dictionaries is a tool for structuring dictionaries (conversion from PDF format to TEI XML), with a supervised machine learning approach (CRF models). Details are explained in (Khemakhem et al. 2017). At LexMC, I have taken part at the GROBID Dictionaries tutorial and workshop; Mohamed Khemakhem, the developer of GROBID…

Teaching a Perfect Knowledge in the Arts and Sciences: Robert Dossie’s chemical, pharmaceutical, and artistic handbooks

By Marieke Hendriksen Robert Dossie (1717-1777) was and English apothecary, experimental chemist, and writer. Within just three years, he published three very successful handbooks: The elaboratory laid open (1758) on chemistry and pharmacy for ‘all practitioners of medicine’, Theory and practice of chirurgical pharmacy (1761) for surgeons, and The handmaid…

Noam Chomsky’s colorless green idea: « corpus linguistics doesn’t mean anything »

From Berkeley to Paris In Spring 2002,  I attended a lecture on linguistics by American linguist Noam Chomsky at UC Berkeley. At the time, I was working as a graduate student instructor in the French department while taking courses in the linguistics department. Chomsky exposed the latest developments of his…

“Stone Soup”: Reflections on Community Conversations

Editorial: This is the final of a series of reflection posts from Recipe Project contributors and editors. By Jennifer Sherman Roberts Recipes form communities. Readers of The Recipes Project know this to be true. Scholars from diverse backgrounds meet in this forum to exchange ideas, thoughts, insights, experiments, and discoveries, brought together…

Panji tales awarded the status of world heritage by UNESCO

Panji tales awarded the status of world heritage by UNESCO 31 October 2017 The unique collection of more than 250 ancient tales revolving around the mythical Javanese Prince Panji, which is curated by Leiden University Libraries (UBL), has been acknowledged as world heritage by UNESCO. The UBL is grateful to…

The Surveillance of Society: It’s Not as New as You Might Think…

The question of the surveillance of society with public and private sectors gathering data on individuals, and the use of computer resources and techniques to do so, is in the headlines today more than ever. The profiling of individuals, which was developed especially during social and economic crises or major…

What is poverty?

Note: before reading this entry, I admit and state that I am a fickle kid who got everything he wanted from his parents, and who had never -or hardly ever- suffered any of these poverties I am talking about. Abstract: Meaning of poverty seems to be something easy and automatic.…

TERRAIN/FIELDWORK: A History of Mining in Wallaga

TERRAIN/FIELDWORK A History of Mining in Wallaga, Western Ethiopia, 1899-1991 by Alemseged Debele Alemseged Debele is PhD candidate in history at Addis Ababa University. His supervisor is Professor Tesema Ta’a. He is conducting research on the history of mineral resources and their extraction in Wallaga, western Ethiopia in the 20th century.  He is one…

Spatialising how?

Maybe the spatial turn doesn’t even have to be a “turn” at all. Splendor Solis, Treaty of Alchemy, “Le chevalier sur la double fontaine” As the readers will now know, the aim of this blog is equally to present readings and conferences about the crisscrossing of geography and the sociology…

Gendered occupations in the water sector

This blog is a collaboration between Cecilia Alda Vida, Maria Rusca, Margreet Zwarteveen, Klaas Schwartz and Nicky Pouw to introduce their publication Occupational genders and gendered occupations: the case of water provisioning in Maputo, Mozambique. Gender, Place & Culture, 1-17, 2017. Madalena lives in Magoanine, a periurban neighbourhood of Maputo, the…

Mary Napier’s “Snaile Milke”: Transmission, Materiality, and Medical Practice

By Alexandra Kennedy For a postgraduate project on material texts, I spent several chilly autumn weeks bundled in a scarf and coat in the Bodleian Library’s Special Collections, pouring over a small, leather-bound manuscript of medical receipts by Mary Napier (née Vyner)—a seventeenth-century English doctor’s wife.  After an initial period…

A plea for pronounceable language names

Suppose you hear that a colleague is working on a language called “@t~q^M#%”. What is your reaction? What’s wrong with the language name “@t~q^M#%”? It’s perfectly unique, it consists only of ASCII characters so is eminently typable, and it has a certain beauty. But of course it lacks pronounceability, so…