Author: Forum Transregionale Studien

The Use of Humor During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Taiwan

By Chunping LinThe word “幽默 yōumò,” which means “humor” in Chinese, is originally from Jiǔzhāng 九章 of the Chu Lyrics 楚辭 Chǔcí (475 B.C. – 221 B.C.) and was used to describe the tranquility of nature.[1] Lin Yutang林語堂 (linguist, philosopher, and translator, 1895–1976) translated the English word “humor” with the…

Chomsky Is No Friend of the Syrian Revolution

By Yassin al-Haj Saleh Just three weeks following my release after 16 years in prison in Syria, I started translating a book into Arabic. The book was “Powers and Prospects: Reflections on Human Nature and the Social Order,” by Noam Chomsky. It had taken me some time to realize that…

Gods and Outcasts: Ambivalent Attitudes towards Health Workers in India during the Coronavirus Pandemic

TRAFO – Blog for Transregional Research By Gautam Liu Gautam Liu. Photo: private. The COVID-19 pandemic in India generated a strange phenomenon in how health workers were perceived. On the one hand officials were not tired in proclaiming doctors and nurses as gods, on the other hand health workers were…

Teaching between Spoon-Feeding and Dialogue: My Experience in Institutions of Higher Education and in Interactive Theater

تجد/ين هنا النسخة العربية لهذا النص. By Marie Elias (French Literature / Theater Studies, University of Damascus / Higher Institute for Dramatic Arts, Damascus, Syria / Saint Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon) Teaching is a difficult, exhausting profession, but an exciting one, and, if handled satisfactorily, it allows for enriching forms…

Heterodox Philology – Michael Allan in conversation with Gauri Viswanathan

Michael Allan, “Heterodox Philology: A Conversation with Gauri Viswanathan”, Philological Encounters 6/1–2, 2021, 243–264. Michael Allan and Gauri Viswanathan discuss connections among philology, literary history, and religion, drawing from writers such as Edward Said, B.R. Ambedkar, Zora Neale Hurston, Louis Massignon, and Kumud Pawde. The conversation was initially conducted via…

Heterodox Philology – Michael Allan in conversation with Gauri Viswanathan

Michael Allan, “Heterodox Philology: A Conversation with Gauri Viswanathan”, Philological Encounters 6/1–2, 2021, 243–264. Michael Allan and Gauri Viswanathan discuss connections among philology, literary history, and religion, drawing from writers such as Edward Said, B.R. Ambedkar, Zora Neale Hurston, Louis Massignon, and Kumud Pawde. The conversation was initially conducted via…

German Medieval Studies and the Arab World: Overcoming Disciplinary and Epistemic Boundaries within the Humanities

تجد/ين هنا النسخة العربية لهذا النص. By Jenny Rahel Oesterle (History, University of Regensburg, Germany) Jenny Rahel Oesterle El-Nabbout. Photo: private. I am a medievalist, specialized in the history of Europe, the Mediterranean and the Middle East. I have worked and received training at several universities throughout my career and…

How the Values of Modernity Contribute to Cultural Mediation

تجد/ين هنا النسخة العربية لهذا النص. Azelarabe Lahkim Bennani (Philosophy, Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah University, Morocco) Azelarabe Lahkim Bennani. Photo: private. This paper aims to address how to invest the capacity of the university to shape dialogue between cultures in an era of multiculturalism and civilizational conflict. As we know,…

On Contemporary Arab Philosophy as a Field of Study

TRAFO – Blog for Transregional Research تجد/ين هنا النسخة العربية لهذا النص. By Elizabeth Suzanne Kassab (Philosophy, Doha Institute for Graduate Studies, Qatar)[1] The Need for Drawing a Map of the Field Elizabeth Suzanne Kassab. Photo: private Modern and contemporary Arab intellectual history remains an understudied field. The last two…

“Innovationitis” and Humanities

تجد/ين هنا النسخة العربية لهذا النص. By Marko Demantowsky (History, University of Vienna, Austria) Marko Demantowsky. Photo: private. You read it everywhere. Everyone talks about it, always as a value in itself. We are all haunted by it, not least at universities, not least in the humanities, by the ubiquitous…

Palestine Potash Limited: Industrial Development in Mandatory Palestine and the Infrastructure of Zionism

By Mona Bieling The British Mandate for Palestine was officially instated in 1923 by the League of Nations. From its beginning, the Mandate government received applications for the rights to exploit the mineral resources of the Dead Sea and its surrounding areas. After a lengthy process, the government finally granted…

Spaces of Participation: Dynamics of Social and Political Change in the Arab World

By Randa Aboubakr, Ulrike Freitag, and Sarah Jurkiewicz The uprisings in the Arab region in late 2010 and early 2011 took many observers of the political scene by surprise, given the authoritarian nature of most regimes in the area. However, the roots and reflections of these uprisings can be found…

Imagining the Telegraph in the Ottoman Empire

TRAFO – Blog for Transregional Research By Pauline Lewis By the 1880s, approximately 20,000 miles of telegraph wires and cables stretched across the Ottoman Empire, circulating more than three million electrical messages each year.[1] As scholars have convincingly shown, the technology offered a powerful new tool for the Ottoman central…

Keeping the Wheels Turning at all Costs: Factories as COVID-19 Clusters – Interview with Aslı Odman

Aslı Odman. Photo: Diane Näcke Factories have been COVID-19 clusters from the beginning of the pandemic. Recently, business have been trying hard to refute the role of the manufacturing sector as the main contributor of new COVID-19 cases, but factories are still among the most aggressive means of spreading the…

Missionary Anxiety Along Ottoman Istanbul’s Railways

TRAFO – Blog for Transregional Research By Gabriel Doyle When new railway lines started to crisscross Ottoman territory at the end of the 19th century, the infrastructural change fuelled a missionary awakening. Catholic congregations, especially, were interested in the urban and rural areas around the Anatolian railway line, which started…

History without Debate: A Reading of the Crisis in Arab Historiography

تجد/ين هنا النسخة العربية لهذا النص. By Abdulhadi Alajmi (History, Kuwait University, Kuwait) Abdulhadi Nasir Alajmi. Photo by Judith Affolter. Many universities in the Arab world, which annually publish thousands of theses, dissertations, academic articles and a numerous range of monographs, follow a common framework, which is the extensive collection…
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search