Alleyway in Shatila This note is a summary of a presentation I gave on the 23rd of September 2016 at Cambridge University’s Department of Architecture’s symposium “Spatial Articulations of Collective Identities in the Context of Middle Eastern Cities”. The talk was included in the panel “Between Loss and Presence” and chaired by Hannah Baumann. Alleyway in Shatila Introduction […]
Read more...
Backview Bollywood #37 by Meena Kadri Backview Bollywood #37 by Meena Kadri is used under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 license. I grew up in an environment where media played its role of being entertainer, teaching about life and religion as well. Especially, Bollywood films have been a big source of entertainment in my family due to language and similar culture. […]
Read more...
Muḥammad Ibn Ṭūlūn (d. 1546), one of the protagonists of this blog, was quite a prolific writer, according to the work list he provided himself in his autobiography al-Fulk al-mashḥūn fī aḥwāl Muḥammad Ibn Ṭūlūn. Judging by the given titles, his complete oeuvre encompasses well above 700 works. Many of those remain only in manuscript–or […]
Read more...
little-red-schoolbook This first blog post offers a brief introduction to one of the most notorious examples of children’s rights activism from the period: Bo Dan Andersen, Jesper Jansen and Søren Hansen’s Den lille røde bog for skoleelever (The little red schoolbook) from 1969. It is a useful place to start our discussions on the children’s ’68 […]
Read more...
printsymbol This article is part of the TRAFO Series „Doing Global International Relations”.   by Amaya Querejazu Much of what we know about global governance can be questioned by taking an ontological turn and see what relational ontologies such as the Andean Cosmovision have to say about reality, the global, being in the world and political arrangements. […]
Read more...
Korea, unknown artist, Five Buddhas, 1725, ink and mineral pigments on hemp, Songgwangsa Temple; conserved by Robert and Sandra Mattielli. Korea, unknown artist, Five Buddhas, 1725, ink and mineral pigments on hemp, Songgwangsa Temple; conserved by Robert and Sandra Mattielli.   Five Buddhas A Korean Icon’s Journey through Time   Portland Art Museum  Jusqu’au 4 décembre 2016   During the three decades when he lived in Seoul, Robert Mattielli often visited the cluster of antique […]
Read more...
Reading Ignaz Goldziher’s summary (1874) of a sufi’s lament over the corruption of Syrian Islamdom under the Mamluks, I was struck by the sufi’s choice in terminology. The Maghribī born ʿAlī b. Maymūn attacks current practices of the jurists and sufis of Syria (and Damascus, in particular) but in the title of his work Bayyān […]
Read more...
[This post is part of The Recipe Project’s annual Teaching Series.  In this post, Dr. Gabe Klehr asks us to think carefully about the ways that we talk and teach about the historical experience of “drunkenness.”] By Gabe Klehr Last spring, I taught a new class on the role of alcohol in American history. I […]
Read more...
I am currently preparing an article about stylometry and genre in which I correlate clusters with metadata. One of the present results is that those texts with non typical values in its metadata are better distinguished than the rest: non realistic, texts in which the action takes place in other times or other continents… It […]
Read more...
roemer_abb_1 Lecture by Claudia Römer University of Vienna, Department of Oriental Studies The subject I am going to present here has, besides its Ottomanist approach, a Central European perspective, as it deals with the former “K.K. Akademie Orientalischer Sprachen” in Vienna, founded in 1754 by Maria Theresa, and its students from all over the Habsburg Empire. […]
Read more...
The word ‘digital humanities’ is ringing in all our ears these days. And indeed, this umbrella term encompasses a number of original – and sometimes breathtaking – approaches to old corpora. Yet, reality often enough stays far behind expectations, and the Arabic language and script, in particular, cause obstacles for applications in our field. Thus, […]
Read more...
Last semester was a remarkable one for my students and myself. Zombies slouched into the classroom and taught semiology. We learned about cognitive world-construction by robbing a bank. Finally, aliens appropriated the blackboard and reported on colonization and corporate power. … Weiterlesen →
Read more...
[This post is part of The Recipe Project’s annual Teaching Series.  Here, Drs. James Brown and Angela McShane discuss their work with the Intoxicants Project.] By Dr James Brown (University of Sheffield) and Dr Angela McShane (V&A/University of Sheffield) We’re part of a research project exploring the history of intoxicants (alcohol, tobacco, tea, coffee, and opium) […]
Read more...
By Rachel Adcock On 14 February 1654 the Baptist church that would later meet regularly at Loughwood, East Devon, gathered at nearby Kilmington and recorded the first entry in what is now known and catalogued in the Devon Heritage Centre as a ‘proceedings book’. These earliest records reveal the gathered church’s immediate concerns: strengthening their […]
Read more...
Felix Brahm (photo : private) Felix Brahm (photo : private) Felix Brahm is currently a research fellow of the German Historical Institute in London. He received his Ph.D. from Humboldt University in Berlin with a book on the history of African studies in the era of decolonization, focusing on the question of how academic formation and paradigm shifts were shaped by transnational and local […]
Read more...
To create a blog

To create a blog

To create your own blog, you only have to fill a registration form. Hypotheses is open to the whole academic community: researchers, lecturers, information specialists, librarians, etc. in all humanities and social sciences disciplines.
Hypotheses

Hypotheses

Hypotheses is a publication platform for academic blogs in the humanities and social sciences by the  Centre for Open Electronic Publishing.
About Academic blog

About Academic blog

It is a fast and light publishing mode that allows researchers to provide real-time updates of developments in their own research. Research blogs come in numerous forms: seminar proceedings; accounts of collective research, fieldwork, or archaeological excavations; journal blogs opening up debate to a broader community; discussions forums for research or book projects; research notes; photo blogs, etc. It enables bloggers to interact with readers through comments. It is a simple user-friendly tool that does not require any specialist IT knowledge.