Featured posts

Martin Bauch/Thomas Labbé: „The Dantean Anomaly 1309-1321 – Rapid Climate Change and Late Medieval Europe in a Global Perspective“ #dhmasterclass

In the context of a Junior Research Group („The Dantean Anomaly 1309-1321 – Rapid Climate Change and Late Medieval Europe in a Global Perspective“), funded by the Volkswagen Foundation as a so called Freigeist Fellowship, three sub-projects cooperate to create a dense history of a phase of rapid climate change…

How our contradictions make us human and inspire creativity

(published on AEON, 7/12/16, https://aeon.co/ideas/how-our-contradictions-make-us-human-and-inspire-creativity Have you ever wondered how many contradictory thoughts you have in a day? How many times your thoughts contradict your actions? How often your feelings oppose your principles and beliefs? Most of the time, we don’t see our own contradictions – it’s often easier to…

New version of the cartography package

A new version of the cartography package (v2.0.1) has arrived on CRAN. cartography allows various cartographic representations such as proportional symbols, chroropleth, typology, flows or discontinuities maps. It also offers several features enhancing the graphic presentation of maps like cartographic palettes, layout elements (scale, north arrow, title…), labels, legends or…

Pain, poison, and surgery in fourteenth-century China

Yi-Li Wu It’s hard to set a compound fracture when the patient is in so much pain that he won’t let you touch him. For such situations, the Chinese doctor Wei Yilin (1277-1347) recommended giving the patient a dose of “numbing medicine” (ma yao).  This would make him “fall into…

Report from the CILIP Rare Books and Special Collections Group annual conference, 2017

The Rare Books and Special Collections Group Conference 2017, hosted at the picturesque University of Sussex, had ‘Collections at Risk’ as its theme. Over the course of the three-day conference we heard talks from people working in a variety of roles who approach rare books and special collections from very…

A letter for Emma

22-9-2017 To whoever it may concern, I write to you, because I would like to share some of my personal and professional experiences. Between 2006 and 2010, I coordinated an NFP (Netherlands Fellowship Programme) course on Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in Peru. My contact person at NUFFIC (the Dutch…

Brexit, Trump etc.: The Politics of Nostalgia?

This is the beginning of a paper I gave in June at the conference “The Trump Presidency: A Historical Assessment from Europe” at St Antony’s College Oxford, the complete paper can be found here. Did voters vote for Brexit and Donald Trump because of nostalgia? Does nostalgia help us to understand…

Networks with R

In order to practice with network data with R, we have been playing with the Padgett (1994) Florentine’s wedding dataset (discussed in the lecture). The dataset is available from > library ( network ) > data(flo) > nflo plot(nflo, displaylabels = TRUE, + boxed.labels = + FALSE) The next step…

SUGAR VERSUS HONEY IN BYZANTINE RECIPES

By Petros Bouras-Vallianatos The Byzantine Empire, with its capital in Constantinople (now Istanbul), then a mainly Greek-speaking region, constituted a natural crossroads between East and West for more than a millennium (AD 324–1453). Its history is an indispensable part of the medieval period in both Europe and the Middle East.…

The Brain ‘Is’ the Mind as Much as History ‘Is’ the Future

I can’t stop thinking about Neuroskeptic’s post “You Are Your Brain, So Don’t Blame Your Brain,” which I read over a year ago. The idea that the brain is the cause and essence of all things human resonates with my research on growing neuro-centrism(s) in the past 150 years. Here’s…

Why should we bother about terminology in linguistics?

Those who know me better will be aware that I keep insisting on careful use of terminology in linguistics, especially in grammar (my main area of research), but also in other areas – for example, I often point out that it’s very problematic to use the term borrowing only for…

The rise and fall of TV opening credits

I was recently thinking about the status of a classic threshold of television series – the episode title – and wondering whether the new ways of watching series  – particularly on streaming platforms – actually tended to highlight it more. Then a few weeks later, Netflix announced that they were thinking...

Saint-Omer in the registers of the French royal chancery (99.6% precision!)

As some of the readers will know, I am particularly interested in the city of Saint-Omer in Northern France. This is a good reason to test and search for the first time unknown occurrences of this city, its city officials and chapter officials in the registers of the French royal…

Jews in Muslim Majority Countries – Interview with Yasemin Shooman and Achim Rohde

    This article is part of the TRAFO series “Emerging Topics. Insights from ‘Behind the Scenes’”. Today, we put the spotlight on the International Conference on “Jews in Muslim Majority Countries – History and Prospects”. The event will take place on October 24-27, 2017 in the Jewish Museum Berlin.…

“disant ses heures” : from HIMANIS to HORAE

We are delighted to announce that the French research agency is funding the HORAE project (ANR-17-CE38-0008). HIMANIS also highlights why it is important with one example: Disant ses heures… (Paris, Archives Nationales, JJ44, fol. 98r)un certain lieu ou il estoit alé disant ses heures (translation: a place where he went…

Tales from the Archives: THEATRICAL COSMETICS: MAKING FACE, MAKING “RACE”

In September 2016, The Recipes Project celebrated its fourth birthday. We now have over 500 posts in our archives and over 120 pages for readers to sift through. That’s a lot of material! (And thank you so much to our contributors for sharing such a wealth of knowledge on recipes.) But with…