Featured posts

Book review: Essentialism. Part II

A while ago, I wrote a book review on Essentialism by Greg McKeown. Today I wanted to follow up with a part II. “Why?” you might ask. I gave the book to my dad for his birthday (as an actual book this time). He loved it but when we talked…

Ritual Feast and Transpersonal Experience: Ossetian Religious Traditionalists in Search of Legitimization of Their Revivalist Projects

Sergei Shtyrkov The Republic of North Ossetia is special among other North Caucasian national republics of Russia (“national” means having a non-Russian ethnic majority as the main nation, the titular ethnic group). North Ossetia has got the reputation of a special national republic because it is the only one in…

#DHAL Demystified: The Joys of Founding a DH Regulars’ Table

During a long night in April 2018 the idea for a Digital Humanities regulars’ table in Halle was born. Now, 20 meetings later, I personally have learnt a lot. I found new friendships and had a ton of fun. For me, the key elements of its ongoing success were, keeping…

A horrific crime—at an ominous time

The criminal underworld of medieval Damascus is certainly not my field of expertise. But as for the contemporary audience of Ibn Ṭūlūn’s chronicle Mufākahat al-Khillān, these stories also draw the attention of current readers. This short post relates one such instance from Damascus at the end of the Mamluk period{1}.…

X-Rotary (12): One-mode network of multiple roles

This is the last essay in our series devoted to meeting attendance at the Shanghai Rotary Club. In this post, we propose to analyze the combinations of roles that participants performed during meetings. The following networks result from the projection of the initial two-mode networks of persons-events joined by roles.…

Towards a history of privacy: conceptual and methodological considerations

If privacy is a highly debated topic today, particularly in the USA, it is mainly because of increasing concerns in the last two decades regarding the rise of digitalization, on the one hand, and surveillance promising security against “terrorism,” on the other. As a look at the surge of the…

Open Access Week special edition #2: interview with the ScholarLed team

This year, we are celebrating Open Access Week by introducing fair and scholar-led Open Access publishing initiatives to the DARIAH communities. These endeavors inspire us to re-imagine the relationship between publishing, humanities disciplines and the university and scholars’ own involvement and control over publishing. In the second episode, we spoke…

Learning from Xi (Jingping) – The new “Dictator-App” in China and the digital dictatorship

by Markus Pohlmann Learning from socialism means learning to win. Learning Xi Jingping means winning as well. That is why many people in China now have to serve hours of detention. At first only the party members, the civil servants and the press. However, in the near future this will…

Very Frugal Ways to Cook Rice—Famine Prevention and Common Knowledge in Edo Japan

By Joshua Schlachet If you’ve browsed The Recipes Project in the past several weeks, you may have raised an eyebrow at the unfamiliar black and white squiggles that decorate the top of our page (written, by the way, in a cursive form of premodern Japanese). As my October editorial duties…

This is it!

Yeah, so the little city in the middle is San Francisco…After a long period of doubt, and hard/harsh work, much disappointments and successive failures, here I am, writing from Albany, a fancy town located North from the University of Berkeley. How did I get there? Well, it all started with…

Five Years after Ferguson, a Glimpse into Police Work with Body-Worn Cameras

by Louis Butcher This past summer marked the five-year anniversary of Michael Brown’s killing by police in Ferguson, Missouri. The St. Louis Police Officers’ Association head, Jeff Roorda, acknowledged the occasion by uploading a Facebook post featuring a photo of Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, Brown’s shooter, and a caption…

A report from HOMO TEXTOR

WITH ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS FROM GIOVANNI, ALEX, ANNAPURNA, AND ELLEN The notion of homo textor refers to three dimensions of humans where weaving (texere in Latin) is at stake. First of all, textile production is one of the oldest technologies and constituted the exchange of homo sapiens with the world longer…

Laying the Pavement Where People Actually Walk: Thoughts on Our Chances of Bringing Scholarship Back to the Heart of Scholarly Communication

Recently, the ScholarLed team invited me to contribute to their blog post collection celebrating Open Access Week 2019. It was my pleasure to share some of my thoughts on the conflict between the richness of contemporary scholarship and the prestige economy that defines our current academic evaluation culture. You can…

Do you really remember me? Ending and memories in Breath of the Wild

In most of Breath of the Wild, the main quest comes to feel as a MacGuffin, as characterized by Alfred Hitchcock (who did not invent the term): a device meant to provide motivation to the plot and its protagonists, but which is unimportant in itself.

Mesquite Atole – Kúi Wihog

By Jacqueline Soule Atole is a drink popular throughout Mexico, Central America, and the American Southwest. Atole is a usually a warm drink, generally based on corn, frequently sweetened somehow, and often prepared with cinnamon as well. Atole has countless various recipes for preparation, and every family has their own.…

Validating clusters in hierarchical cluster analysis

In a previous post, I showed how to run HCA with the base-R hclust() function. Here, I introduce a package whose benefit is to provide a way of validating clusters: pvclust. This package allows the user to include confidence estimates through multiscale bootstrap resampling. The motivation for this post is…