Featured posts

Recipes and the Senses: An Introduction

By Hannah Newton   Our enjoyment of food depends not just on how it tastes and smells, but also on what it looks, feels, and sounds like. Crispness, for instance, is perceived when we hear a ‘snap’ as the food breaks between our teeth. This relatively new understanding of gastronomic…

Economic Stagnation in Ethiopia, 1500-1800

TERRAIN/FIELDWORK Economic Stagnation in Ethiopia, 1500-1800 by Mengistie Zewdu Tessema   Mengiste Zewdu is a Master student at the department of History and Heritage Management, Debre Berhan University. His main research interest is the economic history of Ethiopia. He reports here on research conducted in 2017 with the support of…

Voices of a Water Crisis: the case of São Paulo

Oftentimes the unjust distribution of water and water risks exists in a city without apparently sparking much contestation on everyday life. These asymmetric distributions persist just below the surface in the hasty routines of the city, until a moment of crisis brings them to light and makes injustices evident. This…

Tales from the archives: Spring: when thoughts of fancy turn to itchy, watery eyes

In 2017, The Recipes Project celebrated its fifth birthday. We now have nearly 650 posts in our archives and over 160 pages for readers to sift through. That’s a lot of material! (And thank you so much to our contributors for sharing such a wealth of knowledge on recipes.) But with so…

To do or to … give up?

In this blog, Sanela Talič would like to share her experiences with the implementation of “Strengthening Families Program (6-11)” in Slovenia. It is a comprehensive family-focused curriculum that includes 14 sessions of parent training, children’s skills training, and family skills … Continue reading →

African Pentecostals in Catholic Europe: The Politics of Presence in the Twenty-First Century

by Annalisa Butticci   In recent years, the media and material turn in the study of religion has questioned the dominant understanding of religion as an inward and intellectual human experience and has proposed instead a theoretical and methodological approach that focuses on the materiality, sensuality, and aesthetics of religion,…

Medieval Arabic recipes and the history of hummus

By Anny Gaul Between the tenth and fourteenth centuries, cookbooks flourished throughout the Arabic-speaking world, from Baghdad to Murcia. Fortunately for scholars, in recent decades both critical Arabic editions and English translations of these cookbooks have appeared with increasing frequency. Coming from a region frequently cast as a site of…

Human-Climate coevolution in the Lake Abhe paleobasin

TERRAIN/FIELDWORK Lacustrine paleoenvironments and prehistoric occupations in the Lower Awash and Gobaad Valleys: first steps to understanding Human-Climate coevolution in the Lake Abhe paleobasin, Central Afar by Carlo Mologni   Carlo Mologni is a PhD student at the Université Côte d’Azur, France (UMR 7329 GEOAZUR and UMR 7264 CEPAM), his…

The CLiC web app – a corpus tool for studying literary texts

There are already loads of digital humanities tools out there, but they don’t necessarily focus on the literary linguistic analysis of texts. In this post we introduce the CLiC web app, a corpus tool that has been specifically designed to address research questions in stylistics. In addition to standard corpus…

An interview with Professor Elizabeth Durot-Boucé

An interview by Hélène Palma with Professor Elizabeth Durot-Boucé, a specialist of 18th-century English literature, about her latest book Emily philosophe ou le goût du plaisir : à l’ombre des Lumières, roman gothique et roman libertin, Rennes : TIR, 2017.   H. P. : One really striking aspect of your book is…

Revisiting Matt Madden’s Six Panels

In 2014, I wrote a short piece on Matt Madden’s brilliant attempt to summarize the history of American comic books in six panels. Among other things, I suggested that it was difficult to imagine...

The Refractions of Cervantes’ Fictional Figure of Don Quixote in Cinematic, Literary and Therapeutic Narratives Across Cultures

In this blog post, Juan de Dios Torralbo Caballero briefly introduces Multicultural Cervantes, a special issue of Open Cultural Studies published in 2017, based on his foreword, that examines the work of Miguel de Cervantes through its multicultural appropriations. A Guest Article by Dios Torralbo Caballero. The commemoration of the…

Teaching ḥadīth: Ibn Ṭūlūn and the Thulāthiyyāt genre

This week I return to Garret Davidson’s dissertation on post-canonical ḥadīth transmission. Davidson offers a wonderful overview of the genres involved in establishing elevated, i.e. short, chains of transmission and the status that these brought for people who had access to them. While these genres could amount to very different…

Digital Humanities Publishing

I have a long-standing interest in electronic digital publishing. In fact, my first job after getting my master’s degree was with a large scientific publisher, so besides having the experience of an author and editor, I also know a thing … Continue reading →

Why are water wars back on the agenda? And why we think it’s a bad idea!

This is a collective post written by: Ana Elisa Cascão; Alvar Closas; Emanuele Fantini; Goitom Gebreleul; Tobias Ide; Guy Jobbins; Rémy Kinna; Flávia Rocha Loures; Bjørn-Oliver Magsig; Nate Matthews; Owen McIntyre; Filippo Menga; Naho Mirumachi; Ruby Moynihan; Alan Nicol; Terje Oestigaard; Alistair Rieu-Clarke; Jan Selby; Suvi Sojamo; Larry Swatuk; Rawia…

Gregory of Nyssa on sex, gender and hermaphrodites (Greek and English)

Medieval and, to a lesser extent, early modern theologians surpringly often ‚discussed‘ the possibility the Adam was created hermaphrodite. I say ‚discussed‘ as the position was pretty much a straw man – there is very little evidence that medieval theologians ever encountered anyone holding this position, although it is not…