Featured posts

Ancient Cures for Asthma: Do They Really Work?

By Joanna Cunningham, as part of the Undergraduate Series Find out more about ancient ideas on asthma, and whether the remedies that ancient physicians used actually work! Asthma and Its Ancient Background Asthma is an affliction of the lungs which numerous ancient physicians discussed in their writings. It was first mentioned…

Antibiotics, resistant bacteria… and a database of social sciences research !

French version below / Version française ci-dessous In recent years, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become a major concern. This is far from being the first time that the threat of resistant bacteria and the risk of antibiotic shortages have been put at the top of the public health agenda. But…

Antibiotics, resistant bacteria… and a database of social sciences research !

French version below / Version française ci-dessous In recent years, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become a major concern. This is far from being the first time that the threat of resistant bacteria and the risk of antibiotic shortages have been put at the top of the public health agenda. But…

Medical Progress – the Contribution of WWI

During WWI from 1914 to 1918, approximately eight million soldiers were killed, 20 million were retired, and seven million were listed as missing. This is the number of casualties caused by the first war wounds in military history, which is more than the number of deaths and injuries caused by…

What’s in a Name? The Politicization and Commercialization of Toponyms*

Sarah Littisha Jansen, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs sarahl.jansen@carleton.ca Thirteen year-old Juliet, fictional character of the renowned Elizabethan playwright Shakespeare, quite poetically voices the question that is now the raison d’être of the entire academic discipline of critical place-name studies: “What’s in a name? That which we call a…

What’s in a Name? The Politicization and Commercialization of Toponyms*

Sarah Littisha Jansen, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs sarahl.jansen@carleton.ca Thirteen year-old Juliet, fictional character of the renowned Elizabethan playwright Shakespeare, quite poetically voices the question that is now the raison d’être of the entire academic discipline of critical place-name studies: “What’s in a name? That which we call a…

On the governor’s court in Late Mamluk Damascus

In the coming week, the German Historical Institute in Paris hosts a conference on new court history. Organized by Pascal Firges (DHIP) und Regine Maritz (Walter Benjamin Kolleg, Bern), “Towards a New Political History of the Court, c. 1200‒1800” will attempt, from comparative perspectives, to delineate “Practices of Power in Gender,…

Something like a parable

Friday No. 6, November 9th, 2018 Fairy tale time! Today I will tell you a strange story of a man who survived all revolutions, of how he did so, what this has to do with my topic of structural forgetting, and whether there is a moral at the end of…

An explanation of the abrupt climate change cycles of the past 130,000 years

An international team(1) modeled the coupling between the extent of sea ice and marine ice shelves, and the temperature of the waters near the North Atlantic surface. This model explains the steep temperature changes in Greenland and the North Atlantic during the last ice age, between 130,000 and 15,000 years…

An explanation of the abrupt climate change cycles of the past 130,000 years

An international team(1) modeled the coupling between the extent of sea ice and marine ice shelves, and the temperature of the waters near the North Atlantic surface. This model explains the steep temperature changes in Greenland and the North Atlantic during the last ice age, between 130,000 and 15,000 years…

What is the role of the Arts and Humanities in the age of Data Science? Two short proposals

In September 2018, I participated in a panel that explored the question ‘What is the role of the Arts and Humanities in the age of Data Science? The digital dimensions of this question are addressed on an ongoing basis by the Turing Institute’s Data Science and Digital Humanities Special Interest…

What is the role of the Arts and Humanities in the age of Data Science? Two short proposals

In September 2018, I participated in a panel that explored the question ‘What is the role of the Arts and Humanities in the age of Data Science? The digital dimensions of this question are addressed on an ongoing basis by the Turing Institute’s Data Science and Digital Humanities Special Interest…

As Support for the Plan S for Open Access Ramps Up, Global Scientists Draw Attention to its Risks and Possible Implications

Whereas the British Wellcome Trust and the American Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation increase the financial heft of the Plan S by almost 30%, scientists from research and educational institutions in Europe and around the world have publicly expressed their concerns that this Open Access initiative may have severe negative…

The “probability to win” is hard to estimate…

Real-time computation (or estimation) of the “probability to win” is difficult. We’ve seem that in soccer games, in elections… but actually, as a professor, I see that frequently when I grade my students. Consider a classical multiple choice exam. After each question, imagine that you try to compute the probability…

How the individuation scale helps explain universals of coding in countability classes

It sometimes happens that different scholars arrive at similar conclusions more or less independently, and such cases are probably particularly good indications that they are on the right track. It seems that Scott Grimm’s recent study of count-mass, singular-plural and singulative-collective noun pairs (published in 2018) is a good example…

Tales from the archives: the torture of therapeutics in Rome: Galen on pigeon dung

Recently, I have noticed fewer pigeons at Cardiff station. This probably mean that there has been a cull, which even though I’m no fan of pigeons, made me feel rather melancholy. So, in honour of the humble pigeon, here is, fresh from our archives, a fab post by Caroline Petit…