Featured posts

Language revitalization as community building in Occitania: Language, economics and the politics of transmission

Part of the work at Lacito lies at the crossroad between linguistic anthropology and linguistics, and focuses in particular on understanding what linguistic and cultural diversity might mean to humans in the 21st century. Language endangerment and language revitalisation are in a sense part of the problematisation of diversity, and…

‘This Is America’: strengths and paradoxes of a critique of violence

After it was released on 5 May 2018, the music video by Donald Glover (alias Childish Gambino) ‘This Is America,’ quickly went viral. It unleashed passionate debates across both social networks and traditional media. The video generated hundreds of discussions in newspaper articles, videos and blog posts, echoing thousands of…

HEAT! A Recipes Project Thematic Series

As humans, we want to control heat. We want to create heat, temper or even extinguish it, depending on context and purpose. We have a very limited temperature range at which we are comfortable (some microbes and bacteria can survive temperatures as low as -20C and as high as 130C),…

Border Studies Summer School 2018 at the Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan: a brief debrief

From July 2 to 5 2018, I had the chance to attend the Border Studies Summer School organized by the Slavic-Eurasian Research Center (SRC) and the Public Policy School (HOPS) at the Hokkaido University. I live-tweeted in French the different conferences with the hashtag #BSSSSapporo on my account @BenoitVaillot The…

The moving parts and fixed parts of our theories: Why functional-adaptive explanations are more testable

I have recently stumbled upon a new metaphor may might help us think more clearly about different approaches in linguistics: the “moving-parts” metaphor that is sometimes used by generative linguistics. It came up first in a Twitter conversation I had with Peter Jenks, which was originally about how we can…

Dampening Enthusiasm

(James Bryson) At the moment, I am transcribing a fascinating text by Henry More, entitled Enthusiasmus Triumphatus, or a Discourse on the Nature, Causes, Kinds and Cure of Enthusiasm. It was originally published in 1656, but the Project has decided that, for our digital sourcebook, we ought to include the…

African Historiography and the Challenges of European Periodization: A Historical Comment

By Ihediwa Nkemjika Chimee Abstract African historiography has been following divisions, schemes, and sequences set by the Europeans who in the past claimed that there was no such thing as African history and that the history of Africa began with the history of the Europeans in Africa. With this mind-set,…

Eating Crow

By Michael Walkden In 1936, the residents of Tulsa, Oklahoma were seized with a craving for crow. Butchers sent children into the fields, offering $1.50 for every dozen crows they brought back for the chopping block. Nurses and dietitians suggested that crow-meat could become a staple food in hospitals. And…

Capital toponymies, the city as organised remembrance

This article stems from The Centre and the Name, readings in Beirut’s toponymy, a thesis defended at the Sorbonne in May 2018. Hannah Arendt is not very present in studies and research related to geography. Yet the German-American political theorist, maybe one of the greatest of the 20th Century, did offer…

Do butterflies wonder if they are beautiful?

I had a discussion a few weeks ago on the subject of laughter with a girl who had anorexia. She saddened me when she told me that she had not laughed properly in years. Not, she was quick to add, because she had lost her sense of humour. She still…

Into a bicycle history of the Middle East

And now, to something completely different: the bicycle in Middle Eastern History. Whereas today the bicycle is – arguably – mostly known as a vehicle for leisure, around 1900 it was not only a major means of individualized transportation but it also stipulated the restoration and expansion of road networks that…

Climate Change in the Mekong River Basin

Jaap Evers and Assela Pathirana edited a special issue on Adaptation to Climate Change in the Mekong River Basin in the journal Climatic Change. The special issue features research from multiple scientific disciplines (hydrology, engineering, social sciences), a range of themes (e.g. urban, rural, catchment), and on different locations (from…

Tales from the archives: Love and the Longevity of Charms

In September 2018, The Recipes Project will be six years old. There’s been a lot of blogging on this platform, and we are so grateful to all our wonderful contributors. But with so much material on the site, it’s easy for earlier pieces to be forgotten. So, the editors have decided…

Let’s invest more time in research, and less time in reviewing

Over the last three decades, the amount of time linguists spend on reviewing seems to have increased significantly. Reviews of journal papers seem to be getting longer, we spend more time on grant reviewing, and most strikingly, we spend much more energy on abstract reviewing. Maybe this increase in reviewing…

BLOG POST: Wild Boars and Family Values in Poland

Author Information: Marianna Szczygielska, szczygielskam [at] ceu.edu To cite: Szczygielska, Marianna. “Wild Boars and Family Values in Poland.” Bewildering Boar Blog. June 2018, [https://boar.hypotheses.org/472] On May 12th, 2018 St. Hubert’s March took the streets of Warsaw for the first time. The event gathering mostly hunters, foresters, farmers and representatives of the fur…

Illustrating the dragon in Tolkien’s Hobbit: artistic agency and the reader’s reception

This article is written for specialists of Tolkien’s works but not necessarily of its illustrations. It is meant to be published in journals such as Mythlore, Tolkien Studies or the Journal of Tolkien research, exploring the literary dimension of Tolkien’s works. Readers of The Hobbit may be unfamiliar with some…