Author: Nathalie Richard

Measurements and statistics in Cesare Lombroso’s archives

By Marina Laura Sardi, Universidad Nacional de La Plata In order to decipher whether the criminal differed from the sane or the alienated man, Cesare Lombroso compared bodies, faces and skulls. This was possible, in part, because between 1864 and 1876, when he taught the clinic of mental illness at…

Fossil collections from Pleistocene South America in the MNHN

By Richard Fariña, Sebastián Tambusso and Luciano Varela, UdelaR Formed in the highly prestigious school of medicine in Paris, Teodoro Vilardebó must have experienced great concern when the cruel symptoms of the yellow fever he was all too familiar with when treating his patients were observed in himself. What must…

From Le Mans into the World Wide Web: The Advantages of Digital Techniques for Curating, Networking and Exhibition-Making

By Simon Hirzel, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn As a young scientist from Bonn, who is affiliated with the ethnological and archaeological Museum of the Bonn Collection of the Americas (BASA Museum) and who has just started his PhD project there, I was allowed to travel to Le Mans for a month…

Sweating pots

By Irina Podgorny, CONICET/Archivo Histórico del Museo de La Plata, Argentina This story begins in a warehouse of the FAMILLE Association, SOLIDARITÉ ET CULTURES located on the Boulevard de la Liberación in the city of Marseille. Or a little earlier, it is true, on a morning of torrential rain, impossible…

Mobility on Track: the past and the future of railway in the Yucatan peninsula

By Hamid Alberto Abud Russell, Heidelberg University, Germany Mobility in the Yucatan Peninsula is in a state of flux. The Mayan Train, the controversial project of current Mexican president Andrés Manuel López Obrador, promises to upend decades of neglect in terms of federal investment in the region’s infrastructure and bring…

A Mexican polished pebble at Carnac

By Nathalie Richard, Le Mans Université In the storerooms of the Carnac Prehistory Museum there is an ordinary-looking pebble, labelled as a “pre-Columbian archaeological polished pebble”. Protected in a plastic bag, it rests in a box alongside other objects also identified as pre-Columbian, authentic or facsimile, several of which are…
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search