Author: hillarynunn

Recipes and Remote Teaching, the EMROC Way

By Hillary Nunn Suddenly taking your class online? EMROC can help! Campus coronavirus responses are bringing huge unexpected changes to many classes, forcing us to think about ways of sharing knowledge across distances. We never planned it this way, but what a great opportunity for exploring how early modern people…

On Transcription in the Undergraduate Classroom

By Ian MacInnes, Albion College Last year, I taught my upper-level class on Early Modern Women’s Writing for the first time in five years. As I planned the course, I reflected on the enormous difference five years had made in … Continue reading →

Cooking in the Baumfylde Kitchen

By Keri Sanburn Behre, Portland State University I had the opportunity to lead a directed study for a graduating student last summer. The student had been interested in taking my early modern literature class focused on early modern women’s writing, … Continue reading →

Medicine out of Mole-Hairs in Jane Dawson’s Manuscript

By Ashley Gonzalez Though all of Jane Dawson’s recipes are fascinating, perhaps one of the most curious ones involved the medical use of moles for hair loss and hair growth. This interest was noted by multiple people during the Fall … Continue reading →

Teaching Transcribathons and Experiential Learning

By Liza Blake This post is one of seven scheduled to appear in The Recipes Project’s upcoming September Teaching Series, which focuses on new ideas and strategies for teaching with recipes. As we all prepare for the next EMROC Transcribathon … Continue reading →

Sneak Preview: “My Lady Grace Castleton’s Booke of Receipts”

By Elaine Leong and Hillary Nunn In case you missed the news, on Wednesday, EMROC will be hosting our annual transcribathon at the Folger Shakespeare Library. At EMROC headquarters, we’re all super excited and looking forward to the big day. This year, the recipe book at the centre of our…

EXPLORING CPP 10A214: A New Candidate for the Layfield Hand, Part 2

By Hillary Nunn with Rebecca Laroche In my last posting, I reported on a possible new match for the Layfield hand that appears in CPP 10A214. It looked so promising that my collaborator Rebecca Laroche and I immediately began exploring how a new identity for Layfield would change our understanding…

Networking Recipe Writers with “Networking Early Modern Women”

By Melissa Schultheis There are few events that could put me to work before 8 A.M. on a Saturday with a smile on my face, but Networking Early Modern Women was certainly one of them. Networking Women and the subsequent “add-a-thon” trained participants to add early modern women and their…

Exploring Six Degrees of Francis Bacon in Beta

  By Hillary Nunn Since the beta version of Six Degrees of Francis Bacon (SDFB) debuted in September, users have been joyfully exploring early modern social networks with the interface’s easy-to-use tools and color-coded illustrations. The much anticipated launch opens up The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography in a new…

Exploring CPP 10a214: Wingfield Family Lines

Hillary Nunn, with Rebecca Laroche In her July post, Rebecca Laroche addressed the treatments for gout in The College of Physicians of Philadelphia manuscript owned by Anne Layfield. One gout remedy in the manuscript’s later section, Rebecca noted, ends with … Continue reading →
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search