Author: Arthur Charpentier

Testing for Covid-19 in the U.S.

For almost a month, on a daily basis, we are working with colleagues (Romuald, Chi and Mathieu) on modeling the dynamics of the recent pandemic. I learn of lot of things discussing with them, but we keep struggling with the tests. Paul, in Montréal, helped me a little bit, but…

Qui a survécu au naufrage du Titanic?

also known as quiz numéro 4 du cours STT5100 (de la session d’hiver). Vendredi dernier, alors que nous terminions le cours vers midi, François Legault a décrété l’état d’urgence sanitaire pour une quinzaine de jours. Le cours est donc sur la glace depuis une semaine, et (pour l’instant) encore une…

Modeling Pandemics (3)

In Statistical Inference in a Stochastic Epidemic SEIR Model with Control Intervention, a more complex model than the one we’ve seen yesterday was considered (and is called the SEIR model). Consider a population of size N, and assume that S is the number of susceptible, E the number of exposed,…

Modeling pandemics (2)

When introducing the SIR model, in our initial post, we got an ordinary differential equation, but we did not really discuss stability, and periodicity. It has to do with the Jacobian matrix of the system. But first of all, we had three equations for three function, but actually\displaystyle{{\frac{dS}{dt}}+{\frac {dI}{dt}}+{\frac {dR}{dt}}=0}so…

Modeling pandemics (1)

The most popular model to model epidemics is the so-called SIR model – or Kermack-McKendrick. Consider a population of size N, and assume that S is the number of susceptible, I the number of infectious, and R for the number recovered (or immune) individuals, \displaystyle {\begin{aligned}&{\frac {dS}{dt}}=-{\frac {\beta IS}{N}},\\[6pt]&{\frac {dI}{dt}}={\frac…

Function basis and regression

In the first part of the course on linear models, we’ve seen how to construct a linear model when the vector of covariates \boldsymbol{x} is given, so that \mathbb{E}(Y|\boldsymbol{X}=\boldsymbol{x}) is either simply \boldsymbol{x}^\top\boldsymbol{\beta} (for standard linear models) or a functional of \boldsymbol{x}^\top\boldsymbol{\beta} (in GLMs). But more generally, we can consider…

Gini index, poverty and top shares

Consider some ordered income \{y_1,y_2,\dots,y_n\}, with y_1\leq y_2\leq\dots\leq y_n. A classical tool to visualize inequality is Lorenz curve: define the proportion of people F_{i}=i/n (with the convention F_{0}=0); then the cumulated wealth S_{i}=\sum_{j=1}^{i}y_{j} and the fraction of cumulated wealth L_{i}=S_{i}/S_{n} (with again {\displaystyle L_{0}=0}). Then Lorenz curve is simply the…

Testing for a causal effect (with 2 time series)

A few days ago, I came back on a sentence I found (in a French newspaper), where someone was claiming that “… an old variable explains 85% of the change in a new variable. So we can talk about causality” and I tried to explain that it was just stupid…

Lasso Regression (home made)

Again, this post is related to my MAT7381 course, where we will see that it is actually possible to write our own code to compute Lasso regression, \min\left\lbrace\frac{1}{2}\|\mathbf{y}-\mathbf{X}\mathbf{\beta}\|_{\ell_2}^2+\lambda\|\mathbf{\beta}\|_{\ell_1}\right\rbraceWe have to define the soft-thresholding functionS(z,\gamma)=\text{sign}(z)\cdot(|z|-\gamma)_+=\begin{cases}z-\gamma&\text{ if }\gamma>|z|\text{ and }z<0\\z+\gamma&\text{ if }\gamma<|z|\text{ and }z<0 \\0&\text{ if }\gamma\geq|z|\end{cases}The R function would be soft_thresholding…

Quantile Regression (home made, part 2)

A few months ago, I posted a note with some home made codes for quantile regression… there was something odd on the output, but it was because there was a (small) mathematical problem in my equation. So since I should teach those tomorrow, let me fix them. Median Consider a…

More on Random dollars for everyone !

Following my post of yesterday evening, Alex (@AlexSablay) suggested me to look at the Boltzman-Gibbs distribution (e.g. in Yakovenko & Rosser (2009)). There are indeed interesting ideas, and it looks it is more or less what we tried to do in our previous post Again, I found that article hard…

Random dollars for everyone !

During the week-end, Philippe Rivière made me discover an interesting problem, “Everyone in a room keeps giving dollars to random others. You’ll never guess what happens next.”f It was coming from a post, a few years ago on decisionsciencenews.com… This problem was mentioned in recent post since it is related…

On Cochran Theorem (and Orthogonal Projections)

Cochran Theorem – from The distribution of quadratic forms in a normal system, with applications to the analysis of covariance published in 1934 – is probably the most import one in a regression course. It is an application of a nice result on quadratic forms of Gaussian vectors. More precisely,…

On the conjugate function

In the MAT7381 course (graduate course on regression models), we will talk about optimization, and a classical tool is the so-called conjugate. Given a function f:\mathbb{R}^p\to\mathbb{R} its conjugate is function f^{\star}:\mathbb{R}^p\to\mathbb{R} such that f^{\star}(\boldsymbol{y})=\max_{\boldsymbol{x}}\lbrace\boldsymbol{x}^\top\boldsymbol{y}-f(\boldsymbol{x})\rbraceso, long story short, f^{\star}(\boldsymbol{y}) is the maximum gap between the linear function \boldsymbol{x}^\top\boldsymbol{y} and f(\boldsymbol{x}). Just…

Estimates on training vs. validation samples

Before moving to cross-validation, it was natural to say “I will burn 50% (say) of my data to train a model, and then use the remaining to fit the model”. For instance, we can use training data for variable selection (e.g. using some stepwise procedure in a logistic regression), and…

From betting to “prediction market”

This is the second part of a series on sports betting… Sports betting has long fascinated economists and statisticians. Griffith (1949) showed early on that horse race bettors put too much money on horses that have little chance of winning, and too little on those that have the best chance…