Author: Guillaume Desagulier

Graph theory and corpus linguistics

This short post is the first of a series on network graphs for corpus linguistics. Because of the COVID19 pandemic, such graphs have been in the spotlight in the last few months for their ability to illustrate and explain how and how fast an infection spreads across a population. Because…

Towards a distributional construction grammar

In 2017, I was appointed as Junior Research Fellow to the Institut Universitaire de France for five years (2017-2022). The goal of this post is two-fold. I am now halfway through my 5-year research project, and I would like to take this opportunity to invite colleagues and prospective PhD students to collaborate…

Validating clusters in hierarchical cluster analysis

In a previous post, I showed how to run HCA with the base-R hclust() function. Here, I introduce a package whose benefit is to provide a way of validating clusters: pvclust. This package allows the user to include confidence estimates through multiscale bootstrap resampling. The motivation for this post is…

Can word vectors help corpus linguists?

Last month, my paper “Can word vectors help corpus linguists?” was published in Studia Neophilologica. It is part of a special issue following a conference on corpus linguistics held at Avignon University on June 9-10, 2016 : Nouvelles approches du corpus en linguistique anglaise (New approaches to corpora in English…

Clustering corpus data with hierarchical cluster analysis

Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) belongs to the family of multifactorial exploratory approaches. What it does is cluster individuals based on the distance between them. I illustrate HCA with the preposition data set described here. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis HCA comes in two flavors: agglomerative (or ascending) and divisive (or descending). Agglomerative…

The spoken component of the British National Corpus 2014 is out!

British National Corpus 2014 is a project led by the Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science at Lancaster University to create a 100M word corpus of contemporary British English, the BNC-XML, which is now over 20 years old. On November 19th, 2018, the spoken component of the BNC 2014 was…

Word embeddings: the basics

This post is the first of a series on word embeddings, i.e. vector representations of words in a vector space. Word embeddings have been known to linguists for quite some time. Recently, artificial neural networks have taken word embeddings to the next level. I will explain what makes artificial-intelligence-flavored word vectors so…

Why corpus linguists should be wary of kidney stones and Simpson’s paradox

What does your intuition tell you when a phenomenon is  counterintuitive? It is my intuition that you cannot do good research without intuition. But, without safeguards, intuition can play tricks on you. Suppose that scientists compared the efficiency of two drugs to cure a single disease. They ran two clinical trials.…

The Indian exception: complex prepositions in the Kolhapur Corpus

I am a big fan of old corpora. Of course, I do also appreciate XXL corpora compiled semi-blindly from the Web. But, comparatively speaking, the older corpora have the kind of spick-and-span internal structure that makes them pleasant to use. Complex prepositions In a sociolinguistics course that I taught this…

Noam Chomsky’s colorless green idea: « corpus linguistics doesn’t mean anything »

From Berkeley to Paris In Spring 2002,  I attended a lecture on linguistics by American linguist Noam Chomsky at UC Berkeley. At the time, I was working as a graduate student instructor in the French department while taking courses in the linguistics department. Chomsky exposed the latest developments of his…