Author: amandaeherbert

How to cure a ‘headache’ in a Mesopotamian way?

Strahil V. Panayotov (The BabMed, ERC-Project, Free University of Berlin) In 7th century BC Nineveh, in an area located within today’s much-troubled Iraqi city of Mosul, an astonishing episode of human history occurred. Thousands of texts from all corners of the Assyrian empire were brought into the royal capital of…

A Recipe’s Place is in the Classroom

[This post is part of The Recipe Project’s annual Teaching Series.  Here, series editor Amanda Herbert discusses the Folger Shakespeare Library’s “Test-Kitchen.”  This piece was cross-posted on the Folger’s blog, The Collation, which seeks to present bite-sized pieces of useful information and observations from staff and researchers of the Folger Shakespeare Library.]…

Teaching Intoxication

[This post is part of The Recipe Project’s annual Teaching Series.  In this post, Dr. Gabe Klehr asks us to think carefully about the ways that we talk and teach about the historical experience of “drunkenness.”] By Gabe Klehr Last spring, I taught a new class on the role of…

Jolly Good Ale and Old: Or, Were Early Modern People Perpetually Drunk?

[This post is part of The Recipe Project’s annual Teaching Series.  Here, Drs. James Brown and Angela McShane discuss their work with the Intoxicants Project.] By Dr James Brown (University of Sheffield) and Dr Angela McShane (V&A/University of Sheffield) We’re part of a research project exploring the history of intoxicants (alcohol,…

Cooking for a Crowd: Recipes and the Transcribathon

[This post is part of The Recipes Project’s annual Teaching Series.  In this entry, authors Clifton, Sindelar, and Weber share their experiences  in teaching participants in a transcribathon about angelica, an herb found in many early modern recipe books.] Nadia Clifton, Kailan Sindelar, and Breanne Weber In April 2016, the Early…

Recipes and the Unanticipated

[This post is part of The Recipe Project’s annual Teaching Series.  In this entry, Jen Munroe discusses the unintended – and wonderful – consequences of bringing recipes and transcription into the curricula.] By Jennifer Munroe Teaching recipe transcription has become a regular part of my classroom practice. And the more I…

Recipes and the Unanticipated

[This post is part of The Recipe Project’s annual Teaching Series.  In this entry, Jen Munroe discusses the unintended – and wonderful – consequences of bringing recipes and transcription into the curricula.] By Jennifer Munroe Teaching recipe transcription has become a regular part of my classroom practice. And the more I…

Eat Your Primary Sources! Or, Teaching the Taste of History

[This post is part of The Recipe Project’s annual Teaching Series.  In this entry, Ian Mosby discusses his work in teaching food history — and in particular, the culinary history of Canada during the second World War — at the University of Guelph.  This entry has been cross-posted in cooperation with ActiveHistory.ca, a…

Fueling Beer Breweries in Early Modern London

By William M. Cavert The shop down the road that sells alcoholic drinks offers such a variety of beers and ales that while shopping I sometimes imagine myself newly arrived from a communist planned economy into some bewilderingly choice-laden consumer paradise. Beer made in ever-so-small batches by Belgian monks, or…

Room for Food, Spaces for Eating

By Rachel Rich Good food brings people together around a table, and apparently so too does the opportunity to look at good cookbooks. On Saturday April 16th, Catherine Bertola and I co-hosted a workshop organized by online journal FEAST and the Manchester Metropolitan University Library’s Special Collections. We had invited…

Workhouse Diets: Paucity or Plenty? [Part II]

By Lesley Hulonce This is the second part of a post which appeared on Tuesday, 10 May. As Edward Ostler reported to the 1834 Royal Commission, ‘humanity dictates that the inmates of a workhouse should be fed quite as well as a labourer’s family’, and the food, whilst wholesome, should…

Workhouse Diets: Paucity or Plenty? [Part I]

By Lesley Hulonce ‘All we ever get is gruel’, sang the workhouse lads in the 1968 film Oliver! But were workhouse boys like Oliver Twist really forced to bravely step forward and beg for more food? Certainly, in some poor law unions in Britain poor diets generated widely reported scandals.…

‘Recipes for Relationships’: Food, medicine, families and cultural engagement

By Leah Astbury Anne Dormer wrote a series of letters to her sister Elizabeth Trumbull between 1685-1691 about her health and unhappy marriage to the widower Robert Dormer. She described how ‘I apply my self to tend my crazy health, and keep up my weake shattred carcase broken with restless nights…

Transcribing Early Modern Recipes with the crowd on Shakespeare’s World

By Victoria Van Hyning and Paul Dingman Since the launch of the Shakespeare’s World crowdsourcing website on December 10, 2015, transcribing receipt book manuscripts has become a highly interesting and fun (some even say “addictive”) project for numerous users, a.k.a. “citizen humanists,” around the world. They come from many walks…

Vicarious of Dishes: Teaching the Question of the Recipe

By Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft Teaching food history via historical recipes initially flummoxed me. Of course I understood some of the cultural-historical lessons they can help us learn: the ways in which historical actors, at a particular point in time, communicated instructions for the preparation of dishes; the units of measurement…

First Monday Library Chat: Schlesinger Library at Harvard University

This month’s First Monday Library Chat features the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.  We spoke with Marylène Altieri,  Curator of Books and Printed Materials, about the … Continue reading →